Management and Operations (MO)

Focus is on: delivery of operational services and research and financial compliance programs; facilities management; research infrastructure such as capital programs and building and managing of science and technology parks; human resources and international personnel management; and supporting collaborations with international organizations.

Monday, May 8, 2017

M103: Subrecipient Monitoring: What Is It and When Is It Enough?
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Intermediate

The presenter will lay the foundation of what has become known as “subrecipient monitoring” from the days of the Circulars to today having more focus and attention placed on expectations for oversight and monitoring.

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the requirements, tools and methodologies associated with Subrecipient monitoring.
  2. Understand how to identify management and technical risk on subawards; Understand how to develop an effective monitoring plan.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

John Sites, CRA, Manager, Huron Consulting Group

M203: Recruitment the Money Ball Way: Hiring and Retaining "Diamonds in the Rough"
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Basic

Vying for the obvious candidate – with flawless grades, glittering resume, and perfectly impeccable appearance – can sometimes lead to frustrations as they are scooped up by competing employers, or worse, accept a position in your office only to (a) receive and accept a “better" offer shortly thereafter, or (b) bring with them a sense of entitlement and unrealistic expectations of a rapid rise through the ranks. Identifying, attracting, and hiring stellar, (but less-obvious), candidates may at times be more advantageous in the long-run – creating cohesive teams and bringing loyal, engaged, and innovative people into the field of research administration. In this session, we’ll discuss recruiting tools, strategies, and approaches for getting a better return on our investment and diversifying our community. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss their experiences with recruitment challenges and share what has worked for them.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify two or more strategies for identifying, attracting, hiring, and retaining stellar entry-level candidates.
  2. Evaluate recruitment and retention tools including interview questions and onboarding plans.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jessica Robins, CRA, Research Advancement Manager, Arizona State University

M303: Gray is the New Black: Negotiating Uncertainty in Gift vs. Grant Determinations
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Intermediate

We all get to collaborate with different departments/offices on campus for the greater good of our research programs. At UNC Charlotte, the sponsored research office met in the middle with the advancement office to work through some of the black and white traditional classifications of gifts vs. grants to establish a working gray model that is not always cut and dry. Together they established the Foundation Proposal Committee and developed a checklist to evaluate each foundation and corporate proposal and turn those gray areas into opportunities to think outside the box.Appalachian State University is starting down this path and opening up discussions with their advancement office to explore new opportunities for collaboration between the two sides of the gift vs. grant debate.We will share real examples from our campuses through case studies and discussion.

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand one model of how the Advancement Office and Sponsored Research Office collaborate for the good of the University.
  2. Through case studies, learn how to work through the gray areas with the aid of a checklist.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Ellen Zavala, Director of Research Services and Outreach, University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Charna K. Howson, Director, Appalachian State University

M403: Anatomy and Psychology of Sponsored Awards
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

This session is an introduction to award instruments used in sponsored projects and will cover the components of grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements, as well as distinguishing between gifts and awards. Various types of funding sources and methods of awards will be discussed including federal, industry, non-profit and State and local government.

Learning objectives:

  1. Determine if funding is a gift or a grant.
  2. Identify the various parts of a grant or contract.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tammy Good, MSM, CRA, CPRA, Assoc Director of Finance, CTSI at Indiana University

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

R2: Position Filled: 10 Things Every New Sponsored Program Administration (SPA) Should Know
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 8:30am to 9:00am

Content level: Basic

Sponsored Programs offices frequently hire people with no experience in sponsored programs or working with researchers. This can be challenging for both the new employee, the manager and the researchers. In addition to teaching new employees how to do their job, it is equally important to provide mentorship in order to better acclimate them in the realm of sponsored programs in a research setting especially in higher education. Communicating appropriately with their audience (faculty, staff, National Institutes of Health, etc), why the federal standard dates calendar dictates their schedule, the importance of university policies and procedures, and why an open­door policy is critical are a few of the several topics that will be presented. It is critical that employees new to a sponsored programs have a solid foundation and positive training experience. The value for research administration is this information can help develop and keep new sponsored programs administrators. Group discussion and activities will be used to help participants share experiences and achieve learning objectives.

Learning objectives:

  1. Increase understanding of challenges faced by new sponsored programs employees.
  2. Analyze training programs to improve new sponsored programs employees training.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Beth Durak, Senior Managing Research Administrator, Boston University

R7: Grants Management in a Department/Division
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 8:30am to 9:00am

Content level: Basic

This session will discuss issues and tricks related to managing grants from within a department; not a central office. Whether your institution has a central office or not, there are certain things that are just different when you are working on submitting and managing grants from within a department. The session will cover finding funding sources, pre-award submissions and post-award management of grants. The session will also identify additional ways to provide ongoing support for investigators; including trainees, fellows, associates, staff and faculty researchers.

Learning objectives:

  1. Know the differences and similarities between working in a department versus a central office. 
  2. Learn how to support researchers within a department.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kevin Titus, MBA, Business Director, Cincinnati Children's Hospital

T103: Big Bang Theory: Truth Is Stranger Than Fiction
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 9:15am to 10:30am

Content level: Intermediate

If you are a fan of the Big Bang Theory and relate to the situations that arise on the show, you will enjoy this interactive session that uses vignettes from the show to offer case studies in actual dilemmas faced in research administration offices. Your office may not have dealt with a smoking monkey being housed in someone's apartment or all data from the Mars Rover being mysteriously lost but the fictional situations may be closer to the truth than you think.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify strategies for dealing with exceptional faculty.
  2. Find consolation that you are not alone in dealing with things that really should not happen.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Susan Sedwick, PhD, CRA, CSM, Consulting Associate, Attain LLC

T203: Using Philanthropy to Support Research
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

This session will identify and describe the benefits and important differences in securing and using philanthropic gifts to support research. Hear from an experienced fundraiser, and research administrator, how to secure millions in gifts to support important research. We will review simple steps to foster an environment of gift-supported research at your institution; large or small. Learn how to cultivate new and existing donors and how to partner philanthropic funding opportunities with research priorities. We will discuss engaging your faculty, physicians and other staff in philanthropy. Guidelines for distinguishing between gifts and grants will also be shared. Unless your research program is blessed with a fully-funded endowment producing perpetual income sufficient to sustain and grow your research or you’re 100% confident you will be fully funded by the government, then you need to attend this session. This practical session will provide tips to use right away and in the long-term.

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand how to link and support research needs with philanthropic opportunities.
  2. Understand the practical distinction between a sponsored program grant and a philanthropic gift.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kevin Titus, MBA, Business Director, Cincinnati Children's Hospital

T303: Research Financial Projections Using Algorithms and Probabilities
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 1:45pm to 3:00pm

Content level: Advanced

Michigan Technological University created a research financial projection model tool (ASPIRE) using its financial index open balances, pending proposals and anticipated awards.  It allows the campus community (deans,chairs,and administrators) to summarize its projected annual research expenditures, indirect cost recovery (net of cost share) and its incentive returns the through the life of the project. It has opened the gates for better financial planning while eliminating shadow systems.  The projections data is pulled from two University databases: Banner (financial/post-award) and TechTracS (pre-award).  Forecasting the pending proposal and anticipated awards is computed using 3 year rolling average success rates based on two criteria—the success of both the department and the size/amount of research proposal.  A monthly expenditure algorithm is then applied to project future fiscal years. This tool is available upon demand and provides valuable insight to the campus community.

Learning objectives:

  1. Calculate/forecast your institution’s projected annual expenditures, indirect cost recovery (net of cost share) and incentive returns.  Michigan Technological University will share its best practices.
  2. Leverage this information for other institutional analyzing needs, e.g. budgeting or space optimization planning.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Michael Hendricks, Director, Institutional Systems Development & Analysis and Gina LeMay, Director of Sponsored Operations & Information Systems, Michigan Technological University

T403: Research Terms and Conditions
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Basic

This session will describe the changes to the Research Terms and Conditions that implement the Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards (2 CFR § 200).

Certificate: CTRA 101-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand how the revised set of Research Terms and Conditions were conceived.
  2. Learn how agencies will implement the revised Terms and Conditions.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jean Feldman, Head, Policy Office, National Science Foundation

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

W103: Subaward Risk Assessment and Monitoring
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Basic

Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200) brought increased emphasis on proactive and effective management of subrecipients and subawards and has focused our attention on best practices for risk assessment of subrecipients, inclusion of additional terms in subaward agreements to minimize the risks to our institutions and post-award monitoring of subaward expenditures and performance. Let's get together and share our common challenges and the solutions we have found to improve processes and compliance.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify risk assessment and monitoring requirements for subawards.
  2. Identify steps your institution could take to improve processes and compliance.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kim Carter, MPA, CRA, CPRA, CFRA, Executive Director, Office of Sponsored Projects Administration, University of Kentucky

W203: Applying Quality Improvement Processes in Research Administration
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Basic

There are better ways to be an effective research administrator by utilizing quality improvement tools for efficiency and workflow. Using a real Case Study, this session will provide skills and provide tools to effectively look at your current processes and see if those processes can be improved to be an effective administrator.

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand quality improvement methods.
  2. Take examples of methods to implement in their current workflows.

Prerequisites: Basic

Speaker(s):

Jason Claes, MBA, MSM, GRCRA, Business Manager, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center