Professional Development (PD)

Hosts workshops and sessions geared towards: continuing education commitment; building on personal growth and development; leadership; quality of life development; self-assessment; supervisor/staff relations; industrial/workplace psychology; emerging role of research administrators within the culture of research.

Sunday, May 7, 2017

WS7: Nuts and Bolts of the Lifecycle of a Sponsored Project
Sunday, May 7, 2017 - 1:30pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

The keys to having overall success as a research administrator include developing a wide array of skills. We all know that learning the daily tasks and understanding myriad federal regulations are important to successfully performing your job as a new research administration. What you may not realize though is that you also have to develop the right soft skills to really excel in this profession. Come to this session to explore ways to enhance your conversation skills, networking, customer service, and influence of others, and discover why learning the game of twister might come in handy.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify ways to improve your conversation and communication skills.
  2. Develop a toolkit of skills to enhance your influence on others, networking and customer service.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kim Carter, MPA, CRA, CPRA, CFRA, Executive Director, Office of Sponsored Projects Administration, University of Kentucky

Monday, May 8, 2017

M101: Establishing a Community of Practice to Facilitate Research Administration
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Basic

This session will focus on how to establish and sustain a community of practice centered around communication and cooperation across university departments and schools to facilitate effective and informed research administration practices. This session will provide a case study example of on-going efforts to establish a community of practice in a large research university. Interactive exercises will allow for audience engagement and discussion of relevant issues. In addition, the session will discuss challenges faced by administrators given seemingly constant changes in policies, procedures, and research personnel. Having this discussion adds value to the practice of research administration because effective communication and collaboration is a growing expectation among research sponsors, researchers, and administrators. Being able to work with and across university departments is an essential practice given strained resources and demands. Single Principal Investigator (PI) projects are becoming scarce and are being replaced by multi-PI, multi-discipline, multi-site projects requiring a high degree of cooperation.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify and describe at least three important elements needed for establishing a community of practice within their institutions.
  2. List three strategies for effective cooperation and communication across departments and schools at their institutions.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jose Alcaine, PhD, MBA, CRA, Research Coordinator, Virginia Commonwealth University

M201: Discover the Superhero Inside of Every Research Administrator
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Intermediate

According to Wikipedia, in modern popular fiction, a superhero is a type of costumed heroic character who possesses supernatural or superhuman powers and who is dedicated to fighting crime, protecting the public and usually battling supervillains. Does that definition sound uncannily familiar to you? Come to this session and explore your extraordinary skills and abilities and find out why being a research administrator is a lot like being a superhero.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the traits and skills of research administrators that match those of superheroes.
  2. Understand what superpowers you should demonstrate in order to be a successful research administrator.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kim Carter, MPA, CRA, CPRA, CFRA, Executive Director, Office of Sponsored Projects Administration, University of Kentucky and Sean Scott, CRA, Assistant Director, University of Kentucky

M301: Women Leaders in Research Administration: Breaking the Glass Ceiling II (Panel Discussion)
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Basic

Women who hold senior-level research administration positions can offer their expertise and experiences to those in entry-level or junior leadership roles. Panelist will relay stories of their career journey, along with lessons learned about the importance of strategic career planning, networking, education, and professional development. This session will be highly interactive, in order for the panelists to be able to focus on issues that are most salient to the participants.

Learning objectives:

  1. To glean advice from the experience of successful women research administrators and apply the concepts to their own careers.
  2. To challenge themselves to examine their own career priorities and create a plan for the future.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tammy Good, MSM, CRA, CPRA, Associate Director of Finance, CTSI at Indiana University and Sikirat Tijani, MRA, CRA, Associate Director, Grants and Contracts Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

R4: Handling Information Overload: Stress Management for the Busy Research Administrator
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 8:30am to 9:00am

Content level: Basic

Are you constantly adding items to your to-do list and it seems like your list never shrinks? Are you feeling overwhelmed at work and at home? As a research administrator, you’re constantly being bombarded with information from every angle. From emails to social media to organizational meetings, it’s sometimes hard to separate what’s really important. During this discussion we will explore the signs and symptoms of stress and strategies and techniques to overcome information overload, boost productivity and cope and reduce stress.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify what are the signs and symptoms of stress.
  2. Identify examples of actions and strategies to cope with stress and prevent full-blown burnout.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Christy Taylor Bray,  Assistant Director, Research Training and Development, Research Services, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

T101: Social Media in Research Administration #bestpractices #notsoscary
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 9:15am to 10:30am

Content level: Basic

Does the thought of using Twitter for work strike fear in your heart? Have you only used social media for sharing cat pictures and political memes? Is social media a new part of your job, and you don’t even know where to begin? If so, this presentation is for you! Through real life examples from two large research programs at the University of Michigan, we will provide participants with a beginners guide to implementing a social media presence for your research program and faculty. Participants will review the importance and benefits of social media in research dissemination, discuss steps and best practices for creating a social media presence, learn ways to find and generate creative content, and will address and troubleshoot challenges in the process.

Learning objectives:

  1. List basic steps to take before creating a social media presence.
  2. Identify creative ways to access and share content.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Nicholas Prieur, Research Process Manager and Amanda Donovan, Project Coordinator, The University of Michigan

T201: What I Wish I Knew When I Started Working in Research Administration
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

Content level: Basic

This would be a panel comprised of Research Administrators and Departmental Administrators discussing their career successes and pitfalls. The panelists would vary in their years of experience, meaning some would have been in their roles 2-5 years, 5-10 years, and 10-15 years.  Each panelist would share stories of how the pitfalls they have experienced made them successful in their careers or possibly pushed them into another direction in their career path. 

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn from the pitfalls of more experienced Administrators and use this information as a guide when confronting one's own pitfalls.
  2. Build a network from experienced Administrators.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kia Reaves, MBA, CRA, Administrative Officer for Research and Doris Head, CRA, Administrative Officer, Department of Medicine Admin, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

T301: Generation "THEM": Navigating a Multi-Generational Workforce
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 1:45pm to 3:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

Administrators often finding themselves closing their doors and rolling their eyes at their employees "tattling" on the other generations. Everyone seems to believe that their way is the best way. The problem? Often ALL of their ways have merit. This presentation explores the differences in the three primary generations in them American workforce and the "rules" of the Traditionalist that no longer feel relevant to much of its employees. From your boardroom to your thanksgiving table you'll find this information valuable in all facets of your life.

Learning objectives:

  1. State norms and values of each generation in the American workplace.
  2. Describe techniques used that can be used to motivate individuals in each generation.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kristin Scroggin, Masters Communication Studies, Professional Trainer, Workplaces Training Solutions

T401: Training for Mastery: Michigan's Move to Experiential Training for Research Administrators
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Intermediate

This session will share the steps to training program overhaul taken by the University of Michigan in developing "Navigate: Fundamentals", a training program for new research administrators which addresses the full range of learning objectives in pre-award and post-award administration to individuals developing proposals and managing research activities in units. Included in this presentation will share how this large public institution conducted training needs analyses, developed full spectrum learning objectives, and engaged in design and development of an experiential curriculum where learners will see, do, and practice concepts taught to assure job readiness in this growing field. Also shared are training development and design activities begun in Experiential Advanced Budget, Uniform Guidance, and more...

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the steps needed to assess current training programs in research administration and identify gaps in learner needs.
  2. Utilize a framework for training development in research administration for their own organizations, with emphasis on development of programs offering immersive, experiential learning for mastery.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Yvonne Sturt, Assistant Director, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, University of Michigan and Catherine Seay-Ostrowski, MA, SPHR, Business Administrator Staff Specialist, University of Michigan Biomedical Engineering

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

W101: Coaching to Drive Performance
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Basic

You’ve probably asking yourself, ”How can I make sure I’m as effective as I can be? How do I get results when the role of leader keeps changing?“ Our jobs are changing all the time and there is more to be done and fewer employees to get things done. Some of the keys to leadership effectiveness today are coaching and mentoring. You need expert coaching techniques to ensure that your team members know their positions, fully devote their talents to the task at hand and support their teammates. This session is designed for any person in a role that leads and influences other's performance, desiring to further hone their coaching skills to bring out the full potential in others.

Learning objectives:

  1. Create an environment of caring and cooperation that inspires people to go the extra mile. 
  2. Provide effective feedback and assess progress towards goals and sustaining improved performance.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Christy Taylor Bray, Assistant Director, Research Training and Development, Research Services, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

W102: Dysfunctional Workplace or You? How Do You Spell RELIEF?
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Basic

We spend so much of our lives in the workplace. The right setting can make even a tedious job something to look forward to, but there are many workplaces that suffer from some degree of dysfunction, which can lead to unhealthy levels of stress. Can you identify the root cause of dysfunction in your workplace? Is it your boss, a colleague, co-worker, stakeholder, or is it YOU? Is your work environment dysfunctional, or just a normal stressful work environment? Understanding an unhealthy work environment can lead to negative stress and what you can do to stop the downward spiral.

Learning objectives:

  1. Look at healthy habits to adopt and practice, on minimizing stress and improving relationships within your organizations.
  2. Understand that “one size does not fit all.”

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Gloria Greene, MA, CRA, Director, Office of Sponsored Programs and Laurel Long, Associate VP for Human Resources, The University of Alabama in Huntsville

W201: Leading with Emotional Intelligence
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Basic

Poised, outgoing, cheerful, having empathy for others, being able to express feelings directly but appropriately, and having the capacity for developing relationships. All of these abilities distinguish individuals with high emotional intelligence which is critical to effective leadership. This session provides you with an understanding of why emotional intelligence abilities are important as a leader. And provide you with practical, positive techniques for promoting and improving emotional intelligence as a leader within your business environment. As well as, discovering your hot buttons and how to keep others from pushing them.

Learning objectives:

  1. Recognize why emotional intelligence is important in the workplace and the actions that demonstrate emotional intelligence.
  2. Tackle life’s challenges with greater self-awareness and implement strategies for communicating with emotional intelligence.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Christy Taylor Bray, Assistant Director, Research Training and Development, Research Services, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston