Introduction to Research Administration and Management (IRAM)

Ideal for someone new to the profession or as a refresher for a more seasoned research administrator, The Introduction to Research Administration and Management certificate explores the broad scope of the multi-faceted profession of research administration.

The comprehensive curriculum - developed by some of the "best of the best" instructors in the field - provides an overview and introduction to the broad field of research administration and management. Elements of the curriculum include understanding the environment and context within which research administration is conducted as it relates to such diverse areas as research law, research ethics, fiscal management, regulatory compliance, sponsored program administration, and pre- and post-award management.

One (1) workshop and seven (7) concurrent sessions
(four (4) required sessions (one from each category) and 
one (1) elective session)

Workshop

WS6: Fundamentals of Research Administration and Management

Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 9:00am to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

This is a full-day workshop intended for new research administrators. The workshop provides a broad overview of research administration. Topics include the language of research administration, pre-award administration including regulations, funding opportunities, proposal preparation, compliance, budgeting, proposal submission, sponsor actions; including the review process, site visits and pre-award negotiations; post-award administration including post-award review, project monitoring and close-out and compliance.

Certificate: IRAM-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify pre and post-award activities for sponsored research activity.
  2. Understand the components of and prepare a proposal and manage the post-award process.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Sharon McCarl, MBA, CRA, Associate Dean, Mellon College of Science, Carnegie Mellon University

Elective Concurrent Session

M102: Finding Funding Opportunities: National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Beyond

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Intermediate

The new era of highly dynamic cutting edge and competitive scientific world demands more efficiency and dedication from all the research community members. Finding suitable funding opportunities is the first major step for the investigators towards achieving that goal. Research administrators properly knowledgeable in the diverse areas of scientific funding can potentially motivate the faculty members while securing the research funding of an organization. This session, therefore, will first address the eternal question: how to find desirable funding opportunities.

Grants.gov is an excellent source of finding funding opportunities for federal grants, contracts and agreements. Although federal agencies like National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Defense (DOD), etc., and especially National Institutes of Health (NIH) are the major sources of bio-medical research funding in USA, institutions cannot depend or survive solely on the federal funding for sustaining their research and academic endeavors, considering the current atmosphere of shrinking federal research budget. Many private research institutions are trying to diversify their portfolios and looking for funding from industry, private sources and foundations. To reach this goal they are relying on various portals or software to find suitable funding opportunities. Various agencies are making special matchmaking databases and search engines to develop search-based tools utilizing ""key words.""

In this session we will discuss various modes, models, portals and software available in the market that capture and assemble these opportunities (in addition to grants.gov). We will discuss how to disseminate this information to the targeted population, the investigators and administrators, effectively and efficiently for its maximum utilization and success. We will also discuss about important steps by which an organization and investigators can try to steer the federal funding to a particular direction and create funding opportunities for future.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Certificate: PA-R

Certificate: NIH-R, Category: I. Pre-award

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify funding opportunities by utilizing free- and subscription-based electronic portals.
  2. Targeted marketing or best practices and standard mechanisms for communicating the opportunities to interested parties.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Dhanonjoy C  Saha, PhD, Director, Office of Grant Support, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

M201: National Science Foundation (NSF) Update

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Basic

This session will cover new developments at the National Science Foundation (NSF) - programs, policies, people and budgets. Senior NSF staff will provide a comprehensive review of what is new and developing at NSF.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn about the NSF Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 and 2017 budgets and administration priorities for NSF programs.
  2. Understand how NSF has implemented recent changes to proposal and award policies and procedures.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Samantha Hunter, Senior Policy Specialist, National Science Foundation

T101: Blaze the Trails to Your Future Professional Development

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 9:15am to 10:30am

Content level: Basic

Leadership in the ever-changing field of research administration is essential to institutional, organizational and personal growth. Institutions need qualified individuals who are current with policies and procedures and can provide the best service to faculty. Professional organizations like Society of Research Administrators (SRA) International need trailblazers that can continue to grow the field and make SRA the industry leader in content delivery. Attendees will learn how contributing in these areas can help research administrators develop into nationally recognized innovators in the field.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Walk away with the ability to use those skills to strengthen and fortify institutional goals.
  2. Learn how to become more involved with SRA International so they will step into the organizational leadership with confidence and build their professional portfolio.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Dominic Esposito, CRA, Director of Sponsored Programs and Research, Baruch College; Ellen Zavala, Director of Research Services and Outreach, University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Rene Hearns, Center Manager/Study Coordinator/Budget Analyst, IIRECC US Department of Veterans Affairs

T204: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Update

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

Content level: Basic

Don’t miss this opportunity to hear about what is new and being developed within the National Institute of Health's (NIH) programs, policies, and budgets.  In this comprehensive review participants will learn about the newest policy updates and how their respective institutions may be impacted. Upon completion of the presentation, participants will have the opportunity to ask questions about new and existing policies and procedures.  Topics include recent and upcoming changes to NIH policy, compliance requirements, and so much more!

Certificate: IRAM-E

Certificate: NIH-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will learn about NIH's budget priorities.
  2. Participants will learn about new policies and compliance initiatives.
  3. Participants will gain insight into current issues at NIH.

Prerequisites: Participants should come with a basic knowledge of NIH.

Speaker(s):

Melinda Nelson, Acting Director, Division of Extramural Research Activities and Chief Grants Management Officer, NIAMS, NIH

T205: On the Same Page: Project Initiation Meetings

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

Content level: Basic

Does your institution provide limited administrative support to Principal Investigators (PI) and require them to have a more active role in project management? The Rochester Institute of Technology has instituted a Project Initiation Meeting (PIM) in order to ensure all parties start on the same page. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the terms and conditions; compliance and reporting requirements; roles and responsibilities (PI, Research Office, Accounting/Finance staff, etc.); University related policies, procedures and compliance issues; and changes to the project since submission (project dates, personnel, budgeted rates, etc.). PIM attendees receive a Terms and Conditions Summary document which summarizes a variety of information including applicable general and specific award conditions and important dates. PI signature is required to acknowledge their understanding and acceptance of the project requirements. This session will discuss the genesis of, continued evolution, usefulness, and importance of this university-wide tool in assisting with project management and compliance.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the benefits of conducting this type of meeting, determine content, identify key meeting participants for their institution.
  2. Assess applicability to their institution, determine considerations for development and implementation, and adoption as a best practice.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Nicholas Rogers, MBA, Senior Grants and Contracts Specialist, Rochester Institute of Technology

T401: Getting Your Principal Investigator to Yes: Negotiating Agreement for Organizational Transformation

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Basic

Many have come to the conclusion that it is difficult to get investigators to change. This can result in frustration when new processes and systems are being implemented to improve efficiencies and reduce institutional risks. In this session we will talk about what makes many investigators resistant to change and tactics that can be used to get their buy in when implementing new processes and/or systems at institutions.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe the obstacles that make investigators resistant to change.
  2. Identify the process of determining stakeholders' value and using it to "negotiate" positive changes to processes.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kevin Ferrell, CRA, Solutions Consultant, Evisions and Anne Schauer, Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, Miami University

T404: 1,000,001 University Rules to Follow; Tips for Managing Your Department's Grant

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Basic

This step-by-step 75-minute presentation will focus on how to successfully manage and maintain a grant and budget awarded to a university department while adhering to federal, state, and university policy and procedures. The American Sign Language and Interpreter Education department at Eastern Kentucky University has been awarded various grants over the past 20 plus years. Amy Milcznski, the interim Associate Chair, and Lorna Grubb, who has worked for the department as the Budget Specialist for the past 15 years, will share strategies and approaches to post-award grant management. This session will briefly discuss overarching Federal and State policies and procedures as outlined in the Office of Management and Budget Uniform Guidance. The primary focus of this presentation will outline daily procedures and processes that will aide participants in organizing and overseeing grant funds. Presenters will share practical strategies for implementing maintenance of thorough records to stay in compliance for clean audit trails. This session will also detail and present efficient and effective records management at a departmental level. Topics covered: records management, database usage, justification, expenditure tracking, and standard operating procedures for a budget office.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Integrate practical application of organizational techniques.
  2. Assess their institutional needs and develop budget formats to ensure clean audits.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Amy Milcznski, MA, Interim Associate Chair and Lorna Grubb, Budget Specialist, Eastern Kentucky University

T405: Thriving in Departmental Cultures: Strategies from the Trenches

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Basic

Although departmental work is fundamentally the same anywhere, anyone who has worked in multiple departments can tell you that each and every location can be very different - even within the same institution. From differences in internal policies, to training infrastructures, to unique tools and systems, the Research Administrator needs to embrace the culture of his or her individual department in order to help it thrive, but can also influence that culture and make it work with his or her own. This discussion session will encourage people to share their own tips and tricks for departmental work in addition to discussing various tools (databases, shadow systems, etc.) that the presenters have developed and used in multiple departments.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Compare strategies for supporting research in departmental roles.
  2. Identify and analyze shortfalls in current practices, while discussing options and avenues for improvement; analyze various technological solutions to common problems and department-specific tools/systems used; share tips and tricks learned.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Heidi Kendig, M Ed (Higher Ed Administration), Senior Financial Administrator, MIT and Kate Mollen,  Associate, Higher Education Consulting, Huron Consulting Group

W101: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Research Training Awards (K Awards) and National Research Service Awards (NRSA)

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Basic

Academic and research institutions thrive on the contributions of the young and new investigators that create the foundations of the future generations of successful academics and scientists. In order to encourage the new talented pool of scientists, NIH has designed the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (NRSA) and the Research Career Development Awards or K awards. The purpose of these grants is to create a new generation of young scientists, and to help the promising new or junior investigators to provide research support with specialized training, mentoring, protected time and resources to achieve research independence at the end of the award duration.

In this session we will review and discuss the eligibility, requirements, and various approaches and strategies to be successful to receive these awards, guidelines and tips about how to design the NRSA and K grant applications and pitfalls to avoid. In addition, we will discuss how to find these opportunities, build teams, develop budgets, and prepare competitive future proposals to become successful, independent scientists.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Certificate: NIH-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the types of NRSA and K-grant support and their requirements.                                                                  
  2. Better provide guidance to staff and potential recipients of NRSA and K-awards.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Debbie Pettitt, Senior Grants Management Specialist, National Institutes of Health and Dhanonjoy C  Saha, PhD, Director, Office of Grant Support

W201: The National Science Foundation (NSF) Proposal Process: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Basic

This session will provide everything you need to know about preparing and submitting a proposal to the National Science Foundation (NSF). Learn about the different types of funding opportunities that NSF employs, where to find the relevant policies governing proposal preparation, merit review, and special guidelines for other topical areas such as conference, RAPID, EAGER and RAISE proposals.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will understand what to look for in an NSF funding opportunity.
  2. Participants will learn about all the required components of an NSF proposal.
  3. Participants will understand what they may and may not include as part of an NSF proposal.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Samantha Hunter, Senior Policy Specialist, National Science Foundation

W204: Effective Leadership Skills for Research Administrators and Clinical Supervisors

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Intermediate

Today's leadership landscape is dynamic with an unpredictable plethora of regulations and budgetary restrictions. Research Administrators and Clinical Supervisors, namely those in administrative and management roles, need a wide range of operational, relational, and analytical skills to effectively carry out their responsibilities. This session will provide information on being an effective leader, doing their jobs well and identifying how leadership skills can directly affect the quality of the performance of staff.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Define the traits of effective leadership; How to approach leadership proactively.
  2. Describe methods of assessing various leadership styles; How to effectively apply leadership principles as a research administrator and/or clinical supervisor.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Timothy Schailey, MS, Director, Research Administration, Thomas Jefferson University, Erin Bailey, Chief Financial Officer CTSI, University at Buffalo and Sarah Danna, Staff Assistant, Family Medicine, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

W205: Building a Bridge: The Importance of Forming and Enhancing Relationships

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Basic

Institutions vary in size, grant activity, resources and needs. It is essential for research administrators to work collectively and “build the bridge” with the various bodies that support the research infrastructure, as we are all on the same team striving for a common goal. The City University of New York (CUNY) is a large university system that consists of 24 colleges. Research Administrators in these colleges must work with several entities to accomplish their goals. Oversight by the university, the colleges and a fiscal agent must be sustained. Efficiencies in research compliance requirements, legal requirements, grant personnel, cost sharing, effort reporting, limited submissions, obtaining funding sources and professional development are some matters that can be complicated. In this session, attendees will learn how these entities work collaboratively to get the job done. We will also share ideas, tips, advice and lessons learned on how to leverage resources and knowledge. 

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify and explore new strategies and ideas to ensure an efficient pre- and post-award process.
  2. Identify how to leverage resources and knowledge to build the bridge.  Learn effective techniques to form and enhance these relationships.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Carolynn Julien, Associate Director, Hunter College of CUNY and Melisa Mendez, Associate Director, Baruch College of CUNY

1. Fundamentals of Sponsored Research Projects

Required Concurrent Session

T303: Budgeting Basics

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 1:45pm to 3:00pm

Content level: Basic

This session focuses on the theory of what is a good budget and the practical, what are the pieces and how to create a budget. The session will include a discussion of cost principles, budget categories, direct and indirect costs, cost sharing and how to create a budget for a sponsored project.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: I. Fundamentals of Sponsored Research Projects

Certificate: PA-E

Certificate: FM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify basic principles used in budgeting
  2. Identify various budget categories, determine allowable and unallowable expenses.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Sharon McCarl, MBA, CRA, Associate Dean, Mellon College of Science, Carnegie Mellon University

2. Legal Issues in Research Administration

Required Concurrent Session

T106: Post-Submission to Award Acceptance

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 9:15am to 10:30am

Content level: Basic

The pre-award office is responsible for dealing with a variety of issues that arise after proposal submission and lead to acceptance of the award. The pre-award administrator should be able to deal with publication restrictions, intellectual property, indemnification, facilities and administrative costs questions, and know how to address such special situations as international agreements and JIT requirements. The session will identify troublesome clauses and discuss how to determine what to accept and what to reject, and other difficult contract review topics.

Certificate: PA-R

Certificate: IRAM-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Review different types of award terms and conditions, including Federal Acquisition Regulations and different grants policy manuals.
  2. Negotiate acceptance of awards.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Renee Vaughan, MDiv, MA, CRA, Financial Practice Manager, Duke University SoM and Monique Gregory, MRA, Research Administrator, University of Central Florida, College of Health & Public Affairs

W103: Understanding the Contract Lifecyle

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Basic

This session will provide the participant with an overview of the life cycle from Request for Proposal (RFP) to award closeout on federal and non-federal contracts. In addition, the session will address some of the problematic language associated with the terms and conditions when accepting these awards. At the end of the session, a participant should have a general understanding of how the contract process works and associated complex terms.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: II.Legal Issues in Research Administration

Certificate: FM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will learn how to administer a federal sponsored research contract from RFP to award in a university environment.
  2. Learn best practices and tips for managing contract funds.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Monique Anderson, Director Administrative Services and Debra Murray, Assistant Director of Compliance, University of Maryland, College Park

W202: Anatomy and Physiology of Sponsored Awards

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Basic

This session will cover the components of grants and contracts, distinguish between gifts and awards, reveal various funding sources and explain the implications of "strings attached or unattached." Introduction to Research Administration and Management (IRAM) Certificate Session.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: II.Legal Issues in Research Administration

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to determine if funding is a gift or a grant.
  2. Participants will be able to identify various parts of a grant or contract.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Nancy Cruikshank, CRA Director of Grants, Research and Sponsored Programs, Slippery Rock University and Yvonne Brewster, Manager, Research Administration and Finance Departments of Anesthesiology and Surgery, University of Pittsburgh

3. Regulatory Compliance

Required Concurrent Session

M105: Building Responsible Conduct of Research Training Programs at Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs)

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Intermediate

Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training programs are required of institutions receiving funding for certain types of grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) often have unique challenges in contrast to larger higher education research universities in complying with these regulations. What strategies can the research administrator apply to design effective RCR education plans? What policies will enhance the “culture of compliance” at the PUI? In this highly interactive session, different institutional perspectives and best practices for developing, implementing and documenting effective RCR training programs and policies for faculty, staff and students at PUIs will be presented.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: III. Regulatory Compliance

Learning objectives:

  1. Attendees will gain an understanding of a variety of proven techniques for delivering effective responsible conduct of research (RCR) training programs and policies at PUIs.
  2. Attendees will learn how to design an effective RCR training plan utilizing different instructional methods to enhance teaching and learning effectiveness.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tony Onofrietti, M.S., CRSS, Director, Research Education, The University of Utah and Dominic Esposito, CRA, Director of Sponsored Programs and Research, Baruch College

M405: International Case Studies in Research Misconduct

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

Research integrity is of paramount importance to our institutions and noncompliance with modern RCR standards can result in severe penalties to the organization, the individual(s), and their reputations. But the modern definition of research misconduct is relatively new, having evolved from hundreds of years of social and ethical issues that have arisen in the practice of scientific research. A review of new and historic cases involving accusations of research misconduct in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine provide some insightful examples of both responsibly and irresponsibly conducted science. What may have been acceptable practice a century ago may be considered unacceptable practice by today’s standards. In this highly interactive session, participants will become familiar with an international case history of research misconduct and will engage in discussion of how these prominent cases have shaped contemporary perspectives on the responsible conduct of research. NOTE: This is a highly interactive session using a wireless audience response system to engage participants, evaluate feedback and formulate group consensus on a variety of ethical issues and questions.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: III. Regulatory Compliance

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe a variety of international cases involving ethical issues in research and apply modern RCR standards to better assess and work through those issues.
  2. Discuss the relevant rules and regulations of modern RCR standards and the ethical principles and cases that justify current institutional compliance policies.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tony Onofrietti, M.S., CRSS, Director, Research Education, The University of Utah

4. Financial Management and Compliance

Required Concurrent Session

M104: New Federal Administration: Impact on Institutions of Higher Educations (IHEs) & the State of Uniform Guidance

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Intermediate

Given a new administration in Washington, DC, this session will explore potential changes for Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) in federal funding for research, regulations and oversight. With a new President there will be many new appointments in Washington including Cabinet positions, heads of federal funding agencies, the Office of Science and Technology Policy and more. Opportunities for re-examination of troublesome policies will be discussed. By April 2017 the Uniform Guidance (UG) will have been in effect for over two years. As the Council on Government Relations (COGR) and the Federal Demonstration Partnership (FDP) continue to work with the Office of the Management and Budget (OMB) and the Council on Financial Assistance Reform (COFAR) to develop and understand implementation of the Uniform Guidance, many institutions are still developing an understanding of what the new and revised policies and procedures mean for their organizations. We will cover major ongoing issues in the UG and provide news on recent developments in the dialogue with Federal agencies, OMB and COFAR. The speakers will offer information and experiences about "What Have We Been Doing?" and "What are the Challenges and Opportunities?" Procurement, Conflict of Interest, Project Close-outs, Internal Controls, Compensation - Personal Services and other topics will be examined.  Join us to discuss these major changes in research administration!

Certificate: FM-E, IRAM-IV

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will gain an understanding of current thought on how the new Federal Administration may impact IHE's research activities.
  2. Participants will gain an understanding of the major issues with the Uniform Guidance and expected developments with it.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Deston Halverson, Senior Manager, Higher Education and Academic Medical Centers, Attain, LLC and Sara Bible, Associate Vice Provost, Research Administration, Stanford University

M203: Understanding Cost Transfers

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Basic

Cost transfers, what are they and why are they an important part of grants management? Cost transfers are best described as the process by which we reallocate expenses that were initially charged incorrectly. This session is designed at the basic level for the new departmental administrators based on the lessons learned from a departmental grants manager. In this session you will learn three allowable reasons for cost transfers, the best practices for who is responsible for initiating a cost transfer, who is responsible for documentation, who is responsible for maintaining information, who is responsible for approval, and the importance of preparing cost transfers within the allowable time frame. At each step of the process, the speakers will look at policies and procedures that ensure cost transfers are compliant with federal and institutional regulations.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: IV. Financial Management and Compliance

Certificate: FM-R

Learning objectives:

  1. List three allowable reasons for cost transfers.
  2. Evaluate cost transfers to ensure compliance with federal and institutional regulations.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Paulette Jones, Administrator University of Montana; Karen R. Sack, BS, Department Administrator, University of Maryland Baltimore, School of Medicine and Surekha K. Vishwasaro, MA, MS, Director of Finance, University of Maryland Baltimore, School of Medicine

M303: Closeout, Don't Shut Down

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Basic

Define the KEYS to unlock a less stressful closeout. Simplify your award management process on the path to closeout completion. Discuss the process of closing out Federal awards at Institutions of Higher Education. Describe how the Office of the Management and Budget (OMB) Uniform Guidance can help to guide Institutions through the closeout process. Identify how the Uniform Guidance helps to determine what is allowable and allocable. Presenters will discuss using tools throughout the closeout process such as checklists and advanced notifications to effectively coordinate closeout processes for the multiple individuals responsible for completing closeout reports and/or certifications.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: IV. Financial Management and Compliance

Certificate: FM-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Utilize Federal regulations, Sponsor guidelines and Institutional policies to provide consistency in closing Federal awards.
  2. Create a consistent document or tool to complete a closeout.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Christine Toalepai, Sponsored Programs Administrator, University of Maryland, Baltimore; Marchon Jackson, Director of Sponsored Projects Accounting and Compliance, Division of Research, University of Maryland, College Park and Deborah Fraser, Manager of Cash Management & Invoicing, University of North Carolina Charlotte

M403: Basics of Facilities and Administrative (F&A) – A University Perspective

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

Colleges and universities receiving direct federal awards are typically required to prepare, submit and negotiate a facilities and administrative (F&A) cost rate in order to receive reimbursement for indirect costs. For most people, the F&A calculation appears overly technical and painfully detailed. This session is intended for anyone who is new to the F&A process or would simply like to better understand the basic requirements, inputs and objectives that make up this calculation. Discussion session will include a high-level perspective regarding how the regulations, financial and other data inputs, and submission and negotiation processes work together and will provide practical insight into the application of the F&A rate to the organization’s awards. We will also discuss the impact the new Uniform Guidance will have on preparing and negotiating F&A rates and what participants are doing to prepare for these changes.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: IV. Financial Management and Compliance

Certificate: FM-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify what an F&A rate is, its importance and the various types of costs recovered through the F&A rate.
  2. Explore different types of rates and how they impact recovery and understand the process for preparing, submitting and negotiating the rate under the Uniform Guidance.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Alex Weekes, CPA, PARTNER, ML WEEKES & COMPANY, PC

T305: Indirect Cost Rates – A Non-profit Perspective

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 1:45pm to 3:00pm

Content level: Basic

Almost every research institution must engage in the process of negotiating federal indirect rates. Non-profits face unique challenges in preparing, submitting and negotiating indirect rates. As we go through this process, many of us often wonder if we’ve done everything we can do within the constraints of federal regulations in order to maximize our institution’s negotiated indirect rate and resulting indirect cost recovery. In this session, we will discuss strategies that may be employed to maximize indirect cost recovery, both in the preparation of your indirect rate proposal as well as during the subsequent rate negotiation and budgeting of indirect costs on grants and contracts. Participants will be encouraged to share their experiences concerning the indirect rate process. We will also discuss the impact that the new Uniform Guidance will have on preparing and negotiating indirect rates and what participants are doing to prepare for these changes.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: IV. Financial Management and Compliance

Certificate: FM-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify what an indirect cost rate is, its importance and the various types of costs recovered through the indirect rate.
  2. Explore different types of rates and how they impact recovery and understand the process for preparing, submitting and negotiating the rate under the Uniform Guidance.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Alex Weekes, CPA, PARTNER, ML WEEKES & COMPANY, PC

T403: Closeout of National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grants

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Basic

This session will provide an overview of all National Institutes of Health (NIH) closeout policies and procedures as well as discuss strategies and best practices for proactive compliance. 

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: IV. Financial Management and Compliance

Certificate: FM-E

Certificate: NIH-R, Category: II. Post-award

Learning objectives:

  1. Be familiar with the NIH Closeout process.
  2. Identify strategies for using the Commons closeout module to pro-actively ensure timely reporting.
  3. Identify best practices for closing out grants.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Melinda Nelson, Acting Director, Division of Extramural Research Activities and Chief Grants Management Officer, NIAMS, NIH

W203: Effort Reporting: Understanding the Requirements

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Basic

Effort reporting is a continual area of focus for Offices of Inspectors General and the Justice Department and is a constant hot topic within the research community. Federal regulations and guidance in this important area are often vague and open to varying interpretations. This session will review recent audit and investigation findings related to effort reporting, discuss common pitfalls/red flags for auditors and offer some best practices on how to avoid them. Among the topics that will be covered in this session are effort reporting fundamentals, as well as some of the more challenging aspects of effort reporting, including what’s in and what’s out of institutional base salary and total professional effort, supplemental compensation, what constitutes a “suitable means of verification” and what exactly is an “independent internal evaluation” of the effort reporting process. Additionally, the presenters will address any changes enacted by the A-21 Task Force.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: IV. Financial Management and Compliance

Certificate: FM-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the federal requirements of effort reporting and identify industry best practices for designing and implementing an effective effort reporting process.
  2. Learn what federal auditors and investigators look for when auditing effort reporting, and techniques to mitigate risks of non-compliance at your institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Libre' McAdory, Administrative Director School of Medicine Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore and Lisa Campbell, Associate Administrator for Finance and Research Operations, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins