National Institutes of Health Grants Fundamentals (NIH)

The certificate in National Institutes of Health Grants was produced by SRA International for the benefit of its members who manage NIH grants. It was produced solely by SRA International, and is not an official program of the NIH.

The NIH Grants Management certificate provides a foundation in grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As the NIH is the single largest federal grant-awarding agency, the program is perfect both for someone new to research administration and for research administrators expanding their knowledge of federal funding agencies. The curriculum - anchored by the full-day workshop, "NIH Fundamentals" - provides an overview to the procedures and policies essential to preparing successful applications to and managing grant awards from the National Institutes of Health.

One (1) workshop and five (5) concurrent sessions (three (3) required sessions; two (2) elective sessions)

Required Workshop

WS1: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Fundamentals

Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 9:00am to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

Provides an overview of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), peer review of grant applications,  determination of award levels, grants management review and negotiation of awards, notice of award and pre/post-award management.

Certificate: NIH-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Have a better understanding of the NIH, roles and responsibilities of NIH staff, award mechanisms and grant applications.
  2. Locate funding opportunities, what systems are used at NIH, and pre/post award administration and monitoring.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Terri Jarosik, Supervisory Grants Management Officer, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and Debbie Pettitt, MBA, Chief Grants Management Officier, National Institutes of Health

Required Concurrent Session

M102: Finding Funding Opportunities and Developing Research

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Intermediate

The new era of highly dynamic cutting edge and competitive scientific world demands more efficiency and dedication from all the research community members. Finding suitable funding opportunities is the first major step for the investigators towards achieving that goal. Research administrators properly knowledgeable in the diverse areas of scientific funding can potentially motivate the faculty members while securing the research funding of an organization. This session, therefore, will first address the eternal question: how to find desirable funding opportunities.

Grants.gov is an excellent source of finding funding opportunities for federal grants, contracts and agreements. Although federal agencies like National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Defense (DOD), etc., and especially National Institutes of Health (NIH) are the major sources of bio-medical research funding in USA, institutions cannot depend or survive solely on the federal funding for sustaining their research and academic endeavors, considering the current atmosphere of shrinking federal research budget. Many private research institutions are trying to diversify their portfolios and looking for funding from industry, private sources and foundations. To reach this goal they are relying on various portals or software to find suitable funding opportunities. Various agencies are making special matchmaking databases and search engines to develop search-based tools utilizing ""key words.""

In this session we will discuss various modes, models, portals and software available in the market that capture and assemble these opportunities (in addition to grants.gov). We will discuss how to disseminate this information to the targeted population, the investigators and administrators, effectively and efficiently for its maximum utilization and success. We will also discuss about important steps by which an organization and investigators can try to steer the federal funding to a particular direction and create funding opportunities for future.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Certificate: PA-R

Certificate: NIH-R, Category: I. Pre-award

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify funding opportunities by utilizing free- and subscription-based electronic portals.
  2. Targeted marketing or best practices and standard mechanisms for communicating the opportunities to interested parties.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Dhanonjoy C  Saha, PhD, Director, Office of Grant Support, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

T102: What’s Up with the Common Rule and Single Institutional Review Board (IRB) Regulation Changes and What do Research Administrators Need to Know?

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 9:15am to 10:30am

Content level: Basic

The Common Rule is a basic floor of protections that has covered federally-funded research since 1991 with very few revisions. After over five years of proposed rule-making and public comment periods, the “final rule” was signed into law on January 18, 2017. Change in the revised common rule impact the scope of the law, exemption categories, Institutional Review Board (IRB) operations, and informed consent.  These new rules can have implications at all levels of research: organization leadership, grants and contracts, investigators, and department research administrators.  Research administrators and institutional leadership will receive valuable information during this session regarding the requirement of Single IRB review, IRB reliance agreements, the definition of research and scope requirements of their institutions.  Those that work directly with human research participants will also learn more about the impacts of the consent process.  Because of uncertainty during the transition of presidential administration, there has been confusion about new laws and regulations.  This will be discussed and clarified so that institutions and their research teams are prepared to be compliant, regardless of the status of the regulation.

Certificate: NIH-R, Category: III. Compliance

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the changes to the common rule that will be in effect as of 1/19/18 – 1/20/20.
  2. Describe new requirements of informed consent outlined by the final rule.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Russ Price, Federal Compliance Manager, Utah State University, Office Of Compliance Assistance

T403: Closeout of National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grants

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Basic

This session will provide an overview of all National Institutes of Health (NIH) closeout policies and procedures as well as discuss strategies and best practices for proactive compliance. 

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: IV. Financial Management and Compliance

Certificate: FM-E

Certificate: NIH-R, Category: II. Post-award

Learning objectives:

  1. Be familiar with the NIH Closeout process.
  2. Identify strategies for using the Commons closeout module to pro-actively ensure timely reporting.
  3. Identify best practices for closing out grants.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Melinda Nelson, Acting Director, Division of Extramural Research Activities and Chief Grants Management Officer, NIAMS, NIH

W206: That National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grant is in Trouble: Houston We Have a Problem

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Intermediate

Can you identify the telltale signs of a grant with problems? What do you do when you see them? With examples from National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants, multiple case studies will be used to illustrate warning signs with research grants in trouble and to suggest solutions to correct (or at least mitigate) problems at early as possible.

Certificate: NIH-R, Category: II. Post-award

Learning objectives:

  1. Recognize indicators of problems with a research grant.
  2. Describe possible solutions to specific problems identified with research grants.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Theresa Jarosik, Supervisory Grants Management Officer, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

Elective Concurrent Session

T204: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Update

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

Content level: Basic

Don’t miss this opportunity to hear about what is new and being developed within the National Institute of Health's (NIH) programs, policies, and budgets.  In this comprehensive review participants will learn about the newest policy updates and how their respective institutions may be impacted. Upon completion of the presentation, participants will have the opportunity to ask questions about new and existing policies and procedures.  Topics include recent and upcoming changes to NIH policy, compliance requirements, and so much more!

Certificate: IRAM-E

Certificate: NIH-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will learn about NIH's budget priorities.
  2. Participants will learn about new policies and compliance initiatives.
  3. Participants will gain insight into current issues at NIH.

Prerequisites: Participants should come with a basic knowledge of NIH.

Speaker(s):

Melinda Nelson, Acting Director, Division of Extramural Research Activities and Chief Grants Management Officer, NIAMS, NIH

T306: Leading the US Research Investment towards Finding a Cure for Alzheimer’s Disease

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 1:45pm to 3:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

With the 2011 National Alzheimer's Project Act, research aimed at a cure for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias became a national priority, and a National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease was established. At the direction of Congress, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) develops an annual professional judgment budget to estimate the funds needed to fully pursue scientific opportunities to meet the research goal of the Plan—to effectively treat and prevent Alzheimer's and related dementias by 2025. Biomedical studies and care and services research are addressed in the budget estimate. The professional judgment budget is also called a "bypass budget" because it is submitted to the President and then to Congress, without modification through the traditional Federal budget process. It includes a set of targeted milestones and an estimate of the additional investment needed in fiscal year (FY) 2018, above the base for Alzheimer's and related dementias in the President's FY 2017 budget to help NIH—and the Nation—move forward to end the devastation of dementia. The bypass budget also highlights recent NIH-supported basic, translational, and clinical research—a wealth of studies that are helping us better understand, diagnose, prevent, and treat Alzheimer's and related dementias.

Certificate: NIH-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the funding opportunities available for attendees to influence grant submissions to the NIA.
  2. The NIA budget increased 33.5% for AD related research. Operating a research organization during rapid growth presents challenges and opportunities. Attendees will understand the NIA business model.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Patrick Shirdon, MS, Chief Business Officer, National Institute on Aging

W101: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Research Training Awards (K Awards) and National Research Service Awards (NRSA)

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Basic

Academic and research institutions thrive on the contributions of the young and new investigators that create the foundations of the future generations of successful academics and scientists. In order to encourage the new talented pool of scientists, NIH has designed the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (NRSA) and the Research Career Development Awards or K awards. The purpose of these grants is to create a new generation of young scientists, and to help the promising new or junior investigators to provide research support with specialized training, mentoring, protected time and resources to achieve research independence at the end of the award duration.

In this session we will review and discuss the eligibility, requirements, and various approaches and strategies to be successful to receive these awards, guidelines and tips about how to design the NRSA and K grant applications and pitfalls to avoid. In addition, we will discuss how to find these opportunities, build teams, develop budgets, and prepare competitive future proposals to become successful, independent scientists.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Certificate: NIH-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the types of NRSA and K-grant support and their requirements.                                                                  
  2. Better provide guidance to staff and potential recipients of NRSA and K-awards.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Debbie Pettitt, Senior Grants Management Specialist, National Institutes of Health and Dhanonjoy C  Saha, PhD, Director, Office of Grant Support