Pre-Award (PA)

The best preparation for a successful funding decision is the solid planning and preparation on the variety of issues needed to submit a high quality competitive proposal. The work of pre-award research administrators prepares the way for successful implementation of the funded project. The Pre-Award Certificate provides instruction in the broad scope of responsibility for research administrators who work with investigators to plan, develop, and prepare grant proposals for submission, and who trouble-shoot with various agency personnel, institutional administrators, and investigators to ensure all issues are clarified before an award is made. The program features workshops and sessions on finding and disseminating funding opportunity information, proposal development and submission, budget preparation, award review and acceptance, post-submission communications, the responsible and ethical conduct of research, eRA systems and other relevant topics.

Two (2) workshop and five (5) concurrent sessions (four (4) required sessions; one (1) elective session)

Required Workshop

WS3: Proposal Development

Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 9:00am to 12:30pm

Content level: Basic

"It is well established that research administrators support the budgetary and compliance needs of investigators. What is less well understood are the large and growing number of additional pre-award responsibilities many of us handle at our institutions. Far from being ‘review and submit’ automaton, research administrators hold many roles. They assist new investigators in learning how to find and successfully apply for grant funding; they work with experienced investigators in updating their grant skills and knowledge; and they are seen by many faculty as their trusted partners in grant submission, the last word on all elements related to pre-award issues.

The pre-award support provided by research administrators to faculty being varied and complex, it requires deep knowledge across multiple skillsets. This support includes teaching faculty to and/or assisting faculty with:
• navigating different types of funders and proposals;
• reading and interpreting proposal guidelines efficiently and accurately;
• planning the proposal, involving timelines and checklists, partners, and cost share;
• understanding what proposal parts or sections are expected, how to best address them, and the need to relate the various sections to each other.

Working with real life case studies and hands-on activities, we’ll take you through the entire process of offering detailed and effective non-budgetary support for a faculty proposal submission. Takeaways will include: creating effective project management materials for a proposal, such as timelines, checklists, and outlines; instruction on clear and concise writing for extra-narrative elements of a proposal; high-level discussion of editing proposals for formatting, grammar, and fit with funding agency guidelines."

Certificate: PA-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Become familiar with types of proposals, learn to manage proposal submission and assist with preparation of various types of applications effectively and efficiently from a faculty-centered perspective.
  2. Interpret and address proposal guidelines, including page limits; edit requested sections for clarity and effectiveness to improve proposals' fundability, using project management tools.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Zoya Davis-Hamilton, EdD, CRA, Director, Research Administration Initiatives; Sarah Marina, Assistant Director, Research Development and Research Administration, Tufts University and Anne Schauer, MA, CRA, Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, Miami University

WS9: Fundamentals of Building a Budget

Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 1:30pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

Developing a clear and reasonable budget is one of the most important pieces of the proposal process. The regulations tell us the budget should be the financial expression of the statement of work. The ability to build a budget that directly ties to the work being performed enhances the chances of being funded by the sponsor, and protects us in the case of an audit. Understanding how to work with PIs to craft a sound, reasonable budget and budget justification is essential to our roles as research administrators.

Certificate: PA-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Apply the principles of the Uniform Guidance (including allowability, allocability, and reasonableness, and a host of other specific issues) to the budget construction and justification process.
  2. Confidently collaborate with their faculty to build a sound budget which reflects the scope of work.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Rebecca Hunsaker, Director of Research Administration; Gaye Bugenhagen, Director of Administrative Services, Department of Sociology; Marchon Jackson, Director of Sponsored Projects Accounting and Compliance, Division of Research, University of Maryland, College Park

Required Concurrent Session

M102: Finding Funding Opportunities: National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Beyond

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Intermediate

The new era of highly dynamic cutting edge and competitive scientific world demands more efficiency and dedication from all the research community members. Finding suitable funding opportunities is the first major step for the investigators towards achieving that goal. Research administrators properly knowledgeable in the diverse areas of scientific funding can potentially motivate the faculty members while securing the research funding of an organization. This session, therefore, will first address the eternal question: how to find desirable funding opportunities.

Grants.gov is an excellent source of finding funding opportunities for federal grants, contracts and agreements. Although federal agencies like National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Defense (DOD), etc., and especially National Institutes of Health (NIH) are the major sources of bio-medical research funding in USA, institutions cannot depend or survive solely on the federal funding for sustaining their research and academic endeavors, considering the current atmosphere of shrinking federal research budget. Many private research institutions are trying to diversify their portfolios and looking for funding from industry, private sources and foundations. To reach this goal they are relying on various portals or software to find suitable funding opportunities. Various agencies are making special matchmaking databases and search engines to develop search-based tools utilizing ""key words.""

In this session we will discuss various modes, models, portals and software available in the market that capture and assemble these opportunities (in addition to grants.gov). We will discuss how to disseminate this information to the targeted population, the investigators and administrators, effectively and efficiently for its maximum utilization and success. We will also discuss about important steps by which an organization and investigators can try to steer the federal funding to a particular direction and create funding opportunities for future.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Certificate: PA-R

Certificate: NIH-R, Category: I. Pre-award

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify funding opportunities by utilizing free- and subscription-based electronic portals.
  2. Targeted marketing or best practices and standard mechanisms for communicating the opportunities to interested parties.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Dhanonjoy C  Saha, PhD, Director, Office of Grant Support, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

M302: Pre-award Preparation for Post-award Success

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Basic

Winning a grant award requires preparation at many levels, as does the administration of an award. In this session attendees will learn how to guide the investigator through the in-depth planning required for a successful series of proposals. This includes both scientific and practical preparation such as researching sponsor priorities. On the organization level, preparation and management involves a wide range of compliance issues. Attendees will leave the session with resources for planning and managing proposals and awards. This session will be most useful for newcomers to research administration and administrators at smaller institutions.

Certificate: PA-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Knowledge of the many levels of investigator and institutional compliance.
  2. A framework for guiding investigators to successful proposal activities.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Renee Vaughan,  MDiv, MA, CRA, Financial Practice Manager, Duke University SoM, Camie Morrison, MBA, CRA, CAP,  Director OSR, Rutgers and Monique Gregory, MRA, Research Administrator, Treasurer Southern Sectio, University of Central Florida, College of Health & Public Affairs

T106: Post-Submission to Award Acceptance

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 9:15am to 10:30am

Content level: Basic

The pre-award office is responsible for dealing with a variety of issues that arise after proposal submission and lead to acceptance of the award. The pre-award administrator should be able to deal with publication restrictions, intellectual property, indemnification, facilities and administrative costs questions, and know how to address such special situations as international agreements and JIT requirements. The session will identify troublesome clauses and discuss how to determine what to accept and what to reject, and other difficult contract review topics.

Certificate: PA-R

Certificate: IRAM-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Review different types of award terms and conditions, including Federal Acquisition Regulations and different grants policy manuals.
  2. Negotiate acceptance of awards.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Renee Vaughan, MDiv, MA, CRA, Financial Practice Manager, Duke University SoM and Monique Gregory, MRA, Research Administrator, University of Central Florida, College of Health & Public Affairs

T402: Embedded, Just-in-time Training in Research Administration Systems

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Basic

Arizona State University (ASU) recently deployed a new electronic research administration system with an aggressive schedule. Electronic research administration systems help the research administrator submit and track proposals more efficiently. Yet, delivering training on electronic research administration systems is tricky. Training workshops can provide an overview of new software, but are problematic as they are not only time-intensive but also require learners to apply what they learned at a later time on their own. Meanwhile, traditional online help or software documentation is ineffective in helping users learn and troubleshoot new technology. At ASU, we tackled this problem by developing and delivering “embedded instruction,” online training that is embedded within our electronic research administration system. This approach provides seamless instruction and help to the user at the exact moment that training is needed, or “just in time.” Using a case study of how we delivered training at ASU, presenters will share strategies and best practices for delivering technology training to research administrators.

Certificate: PA-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Cite 3 characteristics of effective training on electronic research administration.
  2. Identify the advantages of “just in time” assistance vs. traditional training.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Drew Brown, PhD, Associate Director and Beth Moser, Instructional Design Specialist, Arizona State Unviersity

Elective Concurrent Session

T303: Budgeting Basics

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 1:45pm to 3:00pm

Content level: Basic

This session focuses on the theory of what is a good budget and the practical, what are the pieces and how to create a budget. The session will include a discussion of cost principles, budget categories, direct and indirect costs, cost sharing and how to create a budget for a sponsored project.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: I. Fundamentals of Sponsored Research Projects

Certificate: PA-E

Certificate: FM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify basic principles used in budgeting
  2. Identify various budget categories, determine allowable and unallowable expenses.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Sharon McCarl, MBA, CRA, Associate Dean, Mellon College of Science, Carnegie Mellon University