Concurrent Sessions

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 9:30am to 10:45am

M101: The Power of Habit

How can some people transform nearly every aspect of their life, while others seem to have the same challenges that they did five, ten, or twenty years ago?  When you look at what made certain people successful you will start to find some common denominators. They were successful by zeroing in on patterns that shape every aspect of their life. They succeeded by transforming habits. In this presentation, we’ll explore how our ingrained habits run our lives and what we can do about it. We will also discuss why some people struggle to change, while change can seem to come quite easy to others. The key to having the success that we want in life, be it in losing weight, being a better parent, and becoming more productive is to understand just how habits work. Once we can harness the power of habit we can transform our lives, whether it’s at work or at home.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify what habits, subconscious or otherwise, are making them stuck.
  2. Have the tools and knowledge to replace those habits, allowing them to achieve the success they desire.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Scott Freedland, Account Executive, Evisions 

M102: Finding Funding Opportunities and Developing Research

The new era of highly dynamic cutting edge and competitive scientific world demands more efficiency and dedication from all the research community members. Finding suitable funding opportunities is the first major step for the investigators towards achieving that goal. Research administrators properly knowledgeable in the diverse areas of scientific funding can potentially motivate the faculty members while securing the research funding of an organization. This session, therefore, will first address the eternal question: how to find desirable funding opportunities.

Grants.gov is an excellent source of finding funding opportunities for federal grants, contracts and agreements. Although federal agencies like National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Defense (DOD), etc., and especially National Institutes of Health (NIH) are the major sources of bio-medical research funding in USA, institutions cannot depend or survive solely on the federal funding for sustaining their research and academic endeavors, considering the current atmosphere of shrinking federal research budget. Many private research institutions are trying to diversify their portfolios and looking for funding from industry, private sources and foundations. To reach this goal they are relying on various portals or software to find suitable funding opportunities. Various agencies are making special matchmaking databases and search engines to develop search-based tools utilizing ""key words.""

In this session we will discuss various modes, models, portals and software available in the market that capture and assemble these opportunities (in addition to grants.gov). We will discuss how to disseminate this information to the targeted population, the investigators and administrators, effectively and efficiently for its maximum utilization and success. We will also discuss about important steps by which an organization and investigators can try to steer the federal funding to a particular direction and create funding opportunities for future.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Certificate: PA-R

Certificate: NIH-R, Category: I. Pre-award

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify funding opportunities by utilizing free- and subscription-based electronic portals.
  2. Targeted marketing or best practices and standard mechanisms for communicating the opportunities to interested parties.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Dhanonjoy C  Saha, PhD, Director, Office of Grant Support, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

M103: Advanced Cost Share Concepts: Opportunities for Leveraging in Collaborative Research

This session will explore creative approaches to leveraging in large, multi-partnered research  opportunities. Administrators will learn how, during the pre-award process, to develop a mixed portfolio of contributions, including such offerings as cost share, in-kind and matching support, waivers on indirect costs, imputed indirect costs, and leveraging existing support for individuals in organizations. Strategies will be explored where Research Administrators (RAs) can take the lead and assist investigators in securing funding from internal and external sources. Participants will individually participate in guided practice to "cobble together" leveraged funds to respond to a large collaborative proposal which includes cost share and matching requirements.

Certificate: FM-R

Content level: Advanced

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify and understand various opportunities research administrative leaders consider in cost share and potential leverage resources when responding to large collaborative sponsored research opportunities.
  2. Build a multi-resource model for a hypothetical collaborative opportunity using multiple leveraged resources.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Denise Wynn, Director, Sponsored Research and Programs, North Carolina Central University

M104: New Federal Administration: Impact on Institutions of Higher Educations (IHEs) & the State of Uniform Guidance

Given a new administration in Washington, DC, this session will explore potential changes for Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) in federal funding for research, regulations and oversight. With a new President there will be many new appointments in Washington including Cabinet positions, heads of federal funding agencies, the Office of Science and Technology Policy and more. Opportunities for re-examination of troublesome policies will be discussed. By April 2017 the Uniform Guidance (UG) will have been in effect for over two years. As the Council on Government Relations (COGR) and the Federal Demonstration Partnership (FDP) continue to work with the Office of the Management and Budget (OMB) and the Council on Financial Assistance Reform (COFAR) to develop and understand implementation of the Uniform Guidance, many institutions are still developing an understanding of what the new and revised policies and procedures mean for their organizations. We will cover major ongoing issues in the UG and provide news on recent developments in the dialogue with Federal agencies, OMB and COFAR. The speakers will offer information and experiences about "What Have We Been Doing?" and "What are the Challenges and Opportunities?" Procurement, Conflict of Interest, Project Close-outs, Internal Controls, Compensation - Personal Services and other topics will be examined.  Join us to discuss these major changes in research administration!

Certificate: FM-E, IRAM-IV

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will gain an understanding of current thought on how the new Federal Administration may impact IHE's research activities.
  2. Participants will gain an understanding of the major issues with the Uniform Guidance and expected developments with it.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Deston Halverson, Senior Manager, Higher Education and Academic Medical Centers, Attain, LLC and Sara Bible, Associate Vice Provost, Research Administration, Stanford University

M105: Building Responsible Conduct of Research Training Programs at Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs)

Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training programs are required of institutions receiving funding for certain types of grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) often have unique challenges in contrast to larger higher education research universities in complying with these regulations. What strategies can the research administrator apply to design effective RCR education plans? What policies will enhance the “culture of compliance” at the PUI? In this highly interactive session, different institutional perspectives and best practices for developing, implementing and documenting effective RCR training programs and policies for faculty, staff and students at PUIs will be presented.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: III. Regulatory Compliance

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Attendees will gain an understanding of a variety of proven techniques for delivering effective responsible conduct of research (RCR) training programs and policies at PUIs.
  2. Attendees will learn how to design an effective RCR training plan utilizing different instructional methods to enhance teaching and learning effectiveness.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tony Onofrietti, M.S., CRSS, Director, Research Education, The University of Utah and Dominic Esposito, CRA, Director of Sponsored Programs and Research, Baruch College

M106: Extreme Makeover: Sponsored Edition

As sponsored administrators, managers and analysts alike, we all face difficult situations that require time and resources to resolve but what happens when resources are limited and the challenges are vast? What happens when turnover and staffing become as much of a challenge as the research management itself? Where does one focus their attention and where does one even begin? In this presentation, two representatives from the Department of Medicine will outline their individual case studies from the same institution. Both speakers will identify their own personal challenges, resolutions and the ultimate fruition of calculated but strategic approaches to seemingly impossible administrative endeavors. Participants are encouraged to speak as a collective forum.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identifying key challenges and resolutions to sponsored award management from an administrative perspective (staffing, training, resources, guidance and support).
  2. Outlining methodologies, tactics and best practice approaches to overcoming these challenges that have proven successful.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Chad Restrick, MSM, CRA, Research Service Manager and Tony Brown, Research Service Manager, Johns Hopkins University

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

LC1: Mindfulness in Science and Research Administration

Applying theories and practice based on the books Mindfulness in Organizations, The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success, and Emotional Intelligence 2.0.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify their strengths and weakness in the EI grid.
  2. Identify uses for mindfulness in their organization, department, or personal lives.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Andrea Nievera, MA, CRA, Senior Financial Analyst, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

LC2: Using Forecasting and Reporting to Meet Your Unit’s Goals

The session will focus on tools and techniques involved in the forecasting process. In addition, we will cover how the forecast process can be used to produce better reports for sponsored research projects and department operating expenses and other types of funding. Participants should leave this session with a basic understanding of the fundamentals of forecasting and various reporting techniques.  Identify key metrics in reporting; make data clear and coherent to all stakeholders; challenges in implementing a forecast and reporting processes; getting buy in key stakeholders.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. How to build a basic forecast template.
  2. How to develop a summary report from your forecast.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marchon Jackson, Director of Sponsored Program Accounting and Compliance; Rebecca Hunsanker, Director of Research Administration and Gaye Bugenhagen, Director Administrative Services, University of Maryland, College Park

LC3: Working Remotely, Are You Telework Ready?

During this session, we will describe what is institution telework ready, what is self telework ready, and list management strategies that can help achieving a successful telework environment, and leading a telework team. First, we will let audiences to participate in a short survey showing on the screen to demonstrate that telework is possible and suitable for Research Administrators. Second, we will describe a list of items that an institution needs to implement in order to be telework ready. Discussion items will include technology, management support, and policy. Third, we will describe a list of items that an individual needs to have/do in order to be telework ready. Discussion items will include individual characteristics, at home working environment and technology, and self preparation. Finally, we will list some management strategies that can help managers to manage telework employees and achieve a successful telework environment. We will share our experiences on being a telework team, and policies and rules we adopted in our institution and our team.  During the presentation, we will also welcome discussions or sharing experiences from audiences. 

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify if their institution or themselves are telework ready.
  2. Identify some of the technology tools and management strategies they can adopt to maximize the effectiveness of telework experience. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Qi Yang, MBA, CRA, Senior Grants Manager and Jennifer Jackson, CRA, Grants Manager, The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Adv. of Military Medicine, Inc.

M201: National Science Foundation (NSF) Update

This session will cover new developments at the National Science Foundation (NSF) - programs, policies, people and budgets. Senior NSF staff will provide a comprehensive review of what is new and developing at NSF.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn about the NSF Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 and 2017 budgets and administration priorities for NSF programs.
  2. Understand how NSF has implemented recent changes to proposal and award policies and procedures.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Samantha Hunter, Senior Policy Specialist, National Science Foundation

M202: Building and Enhancing the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Pipeline

Much recent data on enrollment of U.S. citizens in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines show a continuing need to increase the numbers of women and underrepresented minorities at the undergraduate and graduate levels. However, to increase enrollment of these students it is necessary to have an educational pipeline that prepares highly qualified students to enter college. It is also important to offer robust programs to maintain STEM students through the undergraduate years and prepare them for advanced study or to enter the STEM workforce. This session will provide both strategies and funding opportunities to build and sustain a STEM pipeline from middle school through graduate studies.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify a variety of grant opportunities that support stem education at all levels.
  2. Describe and apply strategies to develop a comprehensive STEM education pipeline at their home institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marjorie Piechowski, PhD, Emerita Director of Research Support, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

M203: Understanding Cost Transfers

Cost transfers, what are they and why are they an important part of grants management? Cost transfers are best described as the process by which we reallocate expenses that were initially charged incorrectly. This session is designed at the basic level for the new departmental administrators based on the lessons learned from a departmental grants manager. In this session you will learn three allowable reasons for cost transfers, the best practices for who is responsible for initiating a cost transfer, who is responsible for documentation, who is responsible for maintaining information, who is responsible for approval, and the importance of preparing cost transfers within the allowable time frame. At each step of the process, the speakers will look at policies and procedures that ensure cost transfers are compliant with federal and institutional regulations.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: IV. Financial Management and Compliance

Certificate: FM-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. List three allowable reasons for cost transfers.
  2. Evaluate cost transfers to ensure compliance with federal and institutional regulations.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Paulette Jones, Administrator University of Montana; Karen R. Sack, BS, Department Administrator, University of Maryland Baltimore, School of Medicine and Surekha K. Vishwasaro, MA, MS, Director of Finance, University of Maryland Baltimore, School of Medicine

M204: Can't Find Qualified Research Administrators? We Have the Answer: Make Your Own!

Finding qualified research administrators is a constant struggle. We have revised our approach to identify candidates by aptitude and interest. Financial background is a plus, but isn't necessary. After all, we can build them! This session will discuss how we identify qualified candidates, hire them, and train them into high performing research administrators. Once hired, we build customized training plans based on the candidate's prior experience and pulling on our internal subject matter experts which creates a network of mentors and support for the new research administrator.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify qualified candidates and hire them.
  2. Train new candidates into high performing research administrators.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Gina Liebig, Assistant Director, Engineering Research Administration, School of Engineering and Sean Collins, Training & Reporting Specialist, Engineering Research Administration, School of Engineering, Stanford University

M205: Indigenous Research Ethics

Indigenous Research Ethics is a (k)new area of academic study arising from the recognition of shifting demographics and awareness articulated by native world scholars. It is at the forefront of expanding mainstream research methodologies because of its linkages with Indigenous epistemology and holistic thinking shaped within authentic processes connected to the care of land and people. The panel will provide an introduction to Indigenous hermeneutics and its role in the design, purpose and function of research for, about, and within Indigenous communities and beyond. Hermeneutics is the theory and methodology of text interpretation, especially the interpretation of biblical texts, wisdom literature, and philosophical texts (Wikipedia). In modern academia it deconstructs the idea: “Whose knowledge is privileged?” In research it asks: “Whose worldview is privileged?” 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. By the end of this panel presentation, participants will be able to recognize abusive research and identify three essential concepts to ensure respectful research with and for Indigenous People.
  2. By the end of this panel presentation, participants will be able to identify six common values across Indigenous communities and strategies for ensuring those values direct the research process.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Terrrilani Chong, MA, Research Administrator, University of Hawaii at Hilo; Shawn Kanaiaupuni, PhD, Director of Policy Analysis & System Evaluation (PASE), Kamehameha Schools; Aulii Silva, Native Hawaiian Student Support Coordinator, Leeward Community College; Kamuela Werner, Research Associate, Department of Native Hawaiian Health; Joan Jensen, MA, Graduate Assistant, University of Hawaii at Manoa; Maile Taualii, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Hawaii and Manulani Aluli Meyer , PhD, Indigenous Scholar-Practitioner, University of Hawaii at West Oahu

M206: Essential Documents - Essential to What and to Whom?

The International Council for Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) Good Clinical Practice (GCP) provides a list of "Essential Documents" that a clinical trial should have to accurately document information throughout the project.  These documents range from administrative data (e.g., financial agreements, data sharing agreements), regulatory data (e.g., Food and Drug Administration  (FDA) documentation, Institutional Review Board (IRB) documentation), training and qualification records, through actual study data. By keeping these documents on file, research sites are more likely to satisfy research monitors and FDA inspectors.  Reviewing these documents, appropriate documentation, and efficient storage of the documentation will be discussed.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand essential documents and the reason that they are necessary for each project.
  2. Identify ways to manage documents at research sites to be ready for monitor and inspections.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tonya Edvalson, CCRP, Regulatory Coordinator II, Intermountain Healthcare

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

LC5: Summer and High School Research Programs: The Essentials and Achievement at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC)

Managing large, complex internship programs can be daunting when considering the various activities involved: creating application systems, reviewing applications, fielding inquiries, responding to referrals, managing students, ensuring regulatory compliance, creating mentor/mentee relationship, etc. This session will draw on the speaker's experience in managing summer student education programs at a cancer research center in New York City to highlight essentials of successful program management. Many of these management principles can be translated to year-round programs for all age groups/educational backgrounds, as well as funding source (philanthropic, foundation, or federal). The role of metrics in measuring impact and conveying information will also be discussed.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Based on the examples learn how to manage your student programs from strategic planning to implementation.
  2. Acquire new strategies and tools for establishing metrics on internship programs.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Farzeen Aslam Correia, Program/Fund Associate, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

LC6: GIFT or GRANT: Researchers, Sponsored Programs and Development Working Together in Harmony

Research Administrators and Development Officers not only have their own understanding of "What is a gift?" and "What is a grant?" but their respective offices have different missions and goals, and they each bring unique strengths and perspectives to the table. Add to this mix the researcher who just wants to secure funding for his/her project and the gift vs. grant problem can create real conflict and dysfunction within an institution. This session will explore the long-standing struggle between Gifts and Grants and the offices that administer them. We will discuss the problems and challenges, and offer strategies for working together in peace and harmony. The presenter will share the successful and mutually beneficial working relationship that she has developed with her counterpart in Development. Participants will be encouraged to share the experiences they have had at their institutions, as well as any successes and/or failures for navigating the gift vs. grant situation.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the key differences between a gift and a grant.
  2. Recognize the strengths and perspectives held by researchers, sponsored programs and development officers on the topic of gifts vs. grants; implement strategies at their institution for developing a mutually beneficial working relationship with their counterparts in Development.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Anne Schauer,  MA, CRA, Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, Miami University

M301: One Step at a Time: Working through Procrastination

Are these familiar phrases: The project is due in a month.  I’ll get started next week. I need to get organized first. I work best under pressure. I need to get some other things done first, then I’ll get started. 95% of the population has deemed that they have a chronic or serious problem with procrastination. Procrastinators are often looked at as people who “bite” off more than they can chew, just can’t get themselves organized or know all the excuses for not starting their projects. As procrastinators on the job, people lose faith in the procrastinators, eventually don’t trust the procrastinator and most times the procrastinator is left behind and can’t advance. Collectively, we’ll explore: some of the reasons why procrastination takes over; consequences of letting procrastination take over and understand the power that procrastination has had over you.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Start a process through which you can begin to overcome the procrastination in your life.
  2. Have a plan to be better equipped to live with your procrastination.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Paulette Jones, BS, Administrator University of Montana

M302: Pre-award Preparation for Post-award Success

Winning a grant award requires preparation at many levels, as does the administration of an award. In this session attendees will learn how to guide the investigator through the in-depth planning required for a successful series of proposals. This includes both scientific and practical preparation such as researching sponsor priorities. On the organization level, preparation and management involves a wide range of compliance issues. Attendees will leave the session with resources for planning and managing proposals and awards. This session will be most useful for newcomers to research administration and administrators at smaller institutions.

Certificate: PA-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Knowledge of the many levels of investigator and institutional compliance.
  2. A framework for guiding investigators to successful proposal activities.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Renee Vaughan,  MDiv, MA, CRA, Financial Practice Manager, Duke University SoM, Camie Morrison, MBA, CRA, CAP,  Director OSR, Rutgers and Monique Gregory, MRA, Research Administrator, Treasurer Southern Sectio, University of Central Florida, College of Health & Public Affairs

M303: Closeout, Don't Shut Down

Define the KEYS to unlock a less stressful closeout. Simplify your award management process on the path to closeout completion. Discuss the process of closing out Federal awards at Institutions of Higher Education. Describe how the Office of the Management and Budget (OMB) Uniform Guidance can help to guide Institutions through the closeout process. Identify how the Uniform Guidance helps to determine what is allowable and allocable. Presenters will discuss using tools throughout the closeout process such as checklists and advanced notifications to effectively coordinate closeout processes for the multiple individuals responsible for completing closeout reports and/or certifications.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: IV. Financial Management and Compliance

Certificate: FM-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Utilize Federal regulations, Sponsor guidelines and Institutional policies to provide consistency in closing Federal awards.
  2. Create a consistent document or tool to complete a closeout.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Christine Toalepai, Sponsored Programs Administrator, University of Maryland, Baltimore; Marchon Jackson, Director of Sponsored Projects Accounting and Compliance, Division of Research, University of Maryland, College Park and Deborah Fraser, Manager of Cash Management & Invoicing, University of North Carolina Charlotte

M304: Examining and Improving Pre-award Processes

Research Administrators (RAs) at institutions of all sizes are tasked with providing excellent pre-award service in an ever-changing environment. While submitting the proposal is the ultimate goal at the pre-award stage, faculty need assistance with tasks such as finding funding, creating budgets, learning electronic systems and institutional and agency compliance. This interactive session will focus on processes and procedures for pre-award administrators at the departmental or institute level at larger institutions or central administrators at smaller institutions that will satisfy faculty, sponsor and institution requirements and ensure post-award success.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe best practice techniques that can be implemented at the departmental or central level.
  2. Improve the pre- to post-award process to streamline award establishment and start-up.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jane Dumsha, PhD, Chief Research Operations Officer, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and Dominic Esposito, Director of Sponsored Programs and Research, Baruch College

M305: Overview Discussion on the Top 5 Gnarly Issues in Research Compliance

Misconduct and quality assurance (repeat offenders?); single Institutional Review Board (IRB) and the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) (bio repository issues); National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards and export controls; lessons from the initial Uniform Guidance (UG) audits; controversies in chimera - stem cells and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) technology ethical dilemmas.

Each one of those could be it's own session. The goal here would be a very quick summary of biggest concerns with Q and A format. Primarily for those with an already working knowledge of the regulations so we can get to the real issues and resolutions or solutions being used by our peers. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Discuss regulatory change and ethical considerations in a broad range of compliance areas.
  2. Learn how other institutions are adapting to and responding to these transitions.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Craig  Allison, MPH, JD, Director of Research Compliance and Integrity and Cindy Kiel, Executive Associate Vice Chancellor, Research, University of California Davis

M306: Faculty Approaches and Methodologies for Clinical Research

The research environment continues to evolve from the early pioneering days of the individual researcher working away in the lab to the more collaborative and out-reaching world of today.  We are also beginning to take a broader look at how research contributes, not only to the clinical disciplines, but to the patients and the communities we look to serve.  This presentation will offer a researcher’s perspective of the changing landscape of research as it migrates toward greater community engagement research.

Content level: Advanced

Learning objectives:

  1. Enhance understanding of your researchers’ world.
  2. Gain an appreciation of current research trends toward more community-engaged research.
  3. Evaluate current practices in support of research development.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Thomas Oates, PhD, Professor and Chair, School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

LC7: Who's Who and What They Do at the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

With this presentation we hope to take away some of the mystery you encounter when contacting the National Institutes of Health (NIH) with questions about your grants. The NIH is composed of myriad offices, institutes and centers, each with its own specific responsibilities and functions. Finding the right NIH office or staff person to contact with your grant issue can sometimes be daunting to the uninitiated. When do you call the Electronic Research Administration (ERA) Helpdesk? What is Code of Federal Regulations (OFM)? Should I talk to the program Officer or the Grants Management Specialist? All will be revealed! At the conclusion of this presentation you will have a basic understanding of who does what at the NIH and how all these offices work together.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify major components of the NIH and locate the appropriate NIH office to address grant inquires.
  2. Locate grants policy resources and important staff contact information.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Debbie Pettitt, Senior Grants Management Specialist, National Institutes of Health

LC8: Managing Service Center Finances

In this Learning Café discussion, senior accounting staff from the University of Maryland, Baltimore will share their hands-on experience with managing the finances associated with several UMB service centers. Discussion topics will include: calculating service fee rates, allowable vs. unallowable operating costs, internal vs. external billings, equipment purchases and depreciation and fiscal year end balances.  Attendees should come away from the discussion with an understanding of the challenges and best practices associated with managing service center financials.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Attendees will understand what is a service center and how it operates.
  2. Attendees will understand the financial components associated with service centers.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jami Kasco, IT Application Analyst Lead, School of Medicine, Institute for Genome Sciences; Karen Clifford, IT Analyst, Applications Lead, School of Medicine, Institute for Genome Sciences and Barbara Wright, IT Analyst, Applications Lead, School of Medicine, Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore

M401: Applying a Project Management Perspective to the Administration of Research

Sponsored research can be defined in terms of a project with a defined scope, timeline, cost and other resources. Understanding the components and phases of designing, developing, executing, monitoring and closing a project using established project management principles can enhance the service research administrators provide to faculty members and other researchers.       

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the the principles of project management.
  2. Apply the principles of project management to the administration of sponsored research grants, contracts, and cooperatives.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Dwayne Lehman, D.Sc., Business Manager, Carnegie Mellon University

M402: Town Hall Meeting – Working with Foundations

This is a presentation will be formatted at an open discussion between the presenters and participates. We ask that participant join us in a lively discussions in which many topics will be covered - highlight the importance of reading and understanding the Private and Foundation funding announcements, the eligibility requirements, the development of a budgets, and the review of contracts should the proposal be funded. In addition, we will discuss questions and topics that participates provide and share best practices or ideas that are currently being used by the group. Staff members from the Bill & Melinda Gates & The Henry M. Jackson Foundations will be prepared to answer any questions.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand how to develop collaborative partnerships with non-profit sectors.
  2. Understand the importance of budinging strategies in developing public-private partnerships.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Cherri Helms,  MS, Grants and Contracts Manager, Jhpiego; Raminta Hanzelka, Senior Program Coordinator, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Qi Yang, MBA, CRA, Senior Grants Manager and Jennifer Jackson, CRA, Grants Manager, Office of Sponsored Programs, The Henry M. Jackson for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Inc.

M403: Basics of Facilities and Administrative (F&A) – A University Perspective

Colleges and universities receiving direct federal awards are typically required to prepare, submit and negotiate a facilities and administrative (F&A) cost rate in order to receive reimbursement for indirect costs. For most people, the F&A calculation appears overly technical and painfully detailed. This session is intended for anyone who is new to the F&A process or would simply like to better understand the basic requirements, inputs and objectives that make up this calculation. Discussion session will include a high-level perspective regarding how the regulations, financial and other data inputs, and submission and negotiation processes work together and will provide practical insight into the application of the F&A rate to the organization’s awards. We will also discuss the impact the new Uniform Guidance will have on preparing and negotiating F&A rates and what participants are doing to prepare for these changes.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: IV. Financial Management and Compliance

Certificate: FM-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify what an F&A rate is, its importance and the various types of costs recovered through the F&A rate.
  2. Explore different types of rates and how they impact recovery and understand the process for preparing, submitting and negotiating the rate under the Uniform Guidance.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Alex Weekes, CPA, PARTNER, ML WEEKES & COMPANY, PC

M404: What Are They Thinking? Perspectives of Central vs. Departmental Research Offices

The presenters will discuss their experiences regarding the differences between department and central research administration. The session will cover each unit's concerns, regarding allowability, allocation, consistency, and compliance. Additionally, the session will highlight differences between major research institutions and lessor research institutions, including Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs).

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Differentiate the perspectives of central vs. departmental research administration.
  2. Integrate the "other's" rationales into your work processes.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kate McCormick, CRA, Senior Grant Administrator, Suffolk University; Rene Hearns, Center Manager/Study Coordinator/Budget Analyst, IIRECC, US Department of Veterans Affairs; Thomas Burns, JD, MBA, Director, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Alexander Galea, Assistant Administrator, Johns Hopkins University

M405: International Case Studies in Research Misconduct

Research integrity is of paramount importance to our institutions and noncompliance with modern RCR standards can result in severe penalties to the organization, the individual(s), and their reputations. But the modern definition of research misconduct is relatively new, having evolved from hundreds of years of social and ethical issues that have arisen in the practice of scientific research. A review of new and historic cases involving accusations of research misconduct in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine provide some insightful examples of both responsibly and irresponsibly conducted science. What may have been acceptable practice a century ago may be considered unacceptable practice by today’s standards. In this highly interactive session, participants will become familiar with an international case history of research misconduct and will engage in discussion of how these prominent cases have shaped contemporary perspectives on the responsible conduct of research. NOTE: This is a highly interactive session using a wireless audience response system to engage participants, evaluate feedback and formulate group consensus on a variety of ethical issues and questions.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: III. Regulatory Compliance

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe a variety of international cases involving ethical issues in research and apply modern RCR standards to better assess and work through those issues.
  2. Discuss the relevant rules and regulations of modern RCR standards and the ethical principles and cases that justify current institutional compliance policies.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tony Onofrietti, M.S., CRSS, Director, Research Education, The University of Utah

M406: Capitated Budgets: Post-award Financial Management of Fixed-price Clinical Contracts

How does managing a fixed-price clinical trial contract differ from a cost reimbursable grant? Even for financial administrators experienced in post-award grant management, capitated budgets may present a challenge. Fixed-price contracts may require a shift in one's perception of and established standards for effort allocation, project periods, budgetary line items, billing procedures, and reconciliation processes. The concepts of flexible budgets, amendable budgets, milestone reimbursements, negotiations with sponsors, flat fees, competitive enrollment, charges vs. costs become a new reality. Recent years show that even National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding is gradually shifting to capitated reimbursement structure for clinical research proposals. In this session participants will utilize sample clinical trial contracts and financial tools to address the differences between fixed-price and cost-reimbursable projects as well as the post-award challenges and the benefits of capitated contracts.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Define main differences in post-award management of fixed-price contracts and cost-reimbursable grants.
  2. Utilize practical skills in post-award financial management of capitated clinical trial contracts.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Pavel Kruchek, MBA, Director, Business Operations, Clinical Trials Office and Vanessa Bryant, Sr. Budget Analyst, Clinical Trials Office, University of Utah

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 8:30am to 9:00am

R1: A Day in the Life of a Sponsored Projects Officers (SPO) and Department Research Administrator

Sponsored Projects Officers (SPO) and Departmental Research Administrators (DRA) face diverse challenges in proposal submissions. Both are integral to the submission process. Working together for a smooth proposal submission requires that the SPO and DRA work together. This requires effective communication, process improvement discussions, and a universal understanding of each person’s role in the proposal submission. Together, we will discuss and identify challenges facing the SPO and DRA in proposal submissions. In addition, we will offer ways to overcome these challenges and offer best practices in working together to facilitate research and smooth proposal submissions.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify ways Sponsored Projects Offices and Departments can work together in facilitating smooth proposal submissions; supporting researchers; and ensuring compliance.
  2. Identify best practices between Departments and Sponsored Projects Offices.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kathy Winkley, BA, Grants/Contracts Officer and Jan Abramson, MS, Sponsored Projects Officer, University of Utah

R2: It's a Digital World

This session is designed to go over the benefits and challenges into creating a paperless work environment. As systems change and technology increasingly supports research administration, universities are being pushed into upgrading our business practices. This discussion will center on how to takes steps toward going towards a paperless office.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Use several applications that will help them elminiate paper and improve effeciency.
  2. Learn about the financial and non-financial benefits of a paperless work environment.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marchon Jackson, Director of Sponsored Program Accounting and Compliance and Debra  Murray, Assistant Director of Compliance, University of Maryland College Park

R3: Discovering Who the Reader Is: Research Adminstrators as Proposal Reviewers

Have you ever considered becoming a ‘reader’? This session will outline why and how a Research Administrator would become involved with an agency grant review process. Impressions of reviews for the U.S. Department of Education’s Strengthening Institutions (Title III), TRIO Upward Bound and the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) programs will be shared. Applications for proposal development training for faculty will also be featured.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Gain deeper understanding for how reviews are handled.
  2. Learn steps for becoming a grant proposal reviewer.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Bonnie Troupe, Director of Academic Development, Stonehill College

R4: Letters of Intent, White Papers, Preproposals, Logic Models, Abstracts, and Quad Charts

Most grant agencies are beginning to require short preliminary papers before a full proposal can be submitted. These short documents serve multiple purposes in funding agencies but sometimes provide little detail on how to prepare them. This session will provide definitions of these short papers, their multiple purposes, and which funding agencies require them. The speaker will offer effective strategies to increase chances of funding success with well-developed short papers that meet agency needs. Agency-specific formats will be illustrated and a template will be provided for agencies that do not offer specific instructions. The session will be useful for research administrators fro all types of organizations.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. List many of the U.S. funding agencies that require these short papers and the multiple purposes they serve.
  2. Describe qualities of successful short papers and apply that knowledge of these qualities and strategies to help ensure a successful grant application.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marjorie Piechowski, PhD, Emerita Director of Research Support, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

R5: Case Study of University of California (UC) Merced’s Centralized & Decentralized Research Development Support Units

The purpose of this research is to present a case study from the newest University of California campus—Merced (UCM)—to discuss how pre-award research development foci and organization may impede or catalyze proposal development. Our research will provide a myriad of campus insight into the best ways to provide pre-award and research administration support, strategies on how to improve the existing infrastructure, and possible ways to prepare greater efficiency and effectiveness as our campus prepares for major changes as we move toward Project 2020, an initiative currently underway to almost double the campus in physical size and student and faculty numbers but not research support staff. Our overall goals of this presentation are two-fold. First, we will evaluate two external program evaluation reports from accredited research administration and development organizations and their recommendations from 2012. By evaluating their recommendations from 4 years ago, we are able to denote which recommendations were followed, which were not, and understand from colleagues at the director and administration-leadership levels why these recommendations were not implemented. Second, we will engage in qualitative interviews with faculty members who regularly seek proposal development assistance from all three schools (Natural Sciences, Engineering, and Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts) and each of the three organized research units (ORUs) (Health Science Research Institute, Sierra Nevada Research Institute, and Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society). In these interviews, we will allow faculty to discuss their views on UCM’s current research development services and how these may or may not flourish, as UCM will almost double in physical size and faculty by the year 2020, noting that the number of research support staff will be doubling in size. Methodologically speaking, we will be using a Constructivist Ground Theory Approach regarding the review of the two program evaluation reports. Allowing pre-award assistance themes to emerge allow for baseline guidance in understanding both positive and negative issues that were already present from the current hierarchical organization just 7 years after the university’s establishment in 2005. Our qualitative interviews will begin with a Convenience Sample of faculty that our units have regularly assisted in the past. Since individual rapport has already been established with these faculty members, trust and entrée into this population should not serve as a barrier. From there, we will utilize a Snowball Sampling Approach, gaining names of other faculty members to discuss their views on the current and future practices of a Centralized Radio Data System (RDS) and decentralized School and ORU unit approach.  Through our research, we will provide campus insight into the best ways to provide pre-award and research administration support, strategies on how to improve the existing menu of services of proposal development support, and possible ways to enact greater efficiency and effectiveness via discussion as our campus prepares for major changes as we move toward major growth with Project 2020.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn best practices and barriers from a centralized unit and quasi-centralized unit in supporting faculty and leadership to obtain extramural funding and discuss strategies that currently work and do not work from a small but growing research university.
  2. Gain valuable and strategic research support insight using baseline data via reports from two research administration organizations and faculty/staff insight on current research support offices as our campus doubles in size/capacity by 2020.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Melinda Boehm, PhD, Research Development Officer, University of California Merced

R6: Overview of Research Administration for Those New to the Grant Process

This session will provide a description and overview of the grant cycle for those new to research administration. Participants will learn the process, start to finish for submitting a grant. From identifying sponsors, collaborators, items to build a budget, how to calculate indirects on complex submissions and working with multiple subcontractors.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify key items for building grant budgets.
  2. Calculate indirect costs on complex submissions (i.e. multiple subcontracts, multiple indirect costs rates).

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kari Black, Grant and Finance Manager, University of Washington      

R7: Department Administration- Central Office Prospective and Challenges Faced

Department Administrators are faced with many day-to-day challenges: Managing ever changing daily responsibilities, providing assistance to faculty and staff, pre-award and post-award administration, understanding and keeping up on federal regulations and agency requirements, sub-recipient monitoring, human resources and payroll, effort reporting and compliance, meeting administration and many other tasks.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify key areas of responsibility in department research administration and the challenges faced.
  2. Discuss strategies and tools for managing workflow, building and maintaining good relationships and resolving challenges in the workplace.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Cindy Morin, Financial Manager, Johns Hopkins University and Darlene Herb, CRA, Program Administrator, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School

R8: The Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) to Request for Proposal (RFP): A Model Parenting Technique to Shape up a Nascent Funding Resource

The Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) is a ""competitive solicitation procedure"" of the Federal Government agencies to obtain scientific proposals (ideas, concepts, etc.) from various organizations for the advancement and acquisition of basic, applied, and some very early stage development research. BAAs are broad in their subject matter and used by agencies to fulfill their requirements for scientific study (or providing services) towards advancing the state-of-the-art or enhancing knowledge rather than focusing on a ""practical application of knowledge"" by acquiring specific systems, hardware procurement, or services, which are generally addressed in Request for Proposal (RFP).
BAAs are conceived as a very early stage (parental) funding resource solely created to increase the knowledge and understanding of certain ""broadly defined areas of interest"" of the Government. Therefore, in contrast to RFPs, any number of proposals, starting from all to none of the offerors, satisfying the requirements of the Government, may be accepted for award and could be accommodated within the overall available funding budget of a particular BAA.
A typical long range BAA has the following life cycle, which may start with the submission request for a ""concept/idea,"" an ""expression of interest,"" or a ""white paper"" (pre-proposal) addressing a particular problem and developing ideas for its solution. After review, only selected pre-proposals are invited for a final proposal submission. Once the selected groups start developing the proposal, it can potentially steer up the direction of government funding towards certain specific fields, services or study techniques for future and quite often it eventually results into a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) or RFP.
In this session, we will address the different models of BAA, its detail description and purpose in general, and its important role in generating FOAs, RFPs etc. Additionally we will also discuss why participation in the BAAs is quite important for a research organization.""

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the concept of BAA, and how they differ from RFA, RFP and FOA.
  2. The BAA response process and how this mechanism can increase the funding portfolio.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Dhanonjoy C  Saha, PhD, Director, Office of Grant Support, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Mindy Solivan, Assistant Director, University of Central Florida, Office of Research & Commercialization

R9: Tipping the Scales: A Case Study for Teaching Faculty Grant Writing

When faculty need grant writing instruction, they are often caught in limbo between research administrators, whose role usually does not include grant writing instruction, and centralized research offices, where tailored support can be inaccessible and in-person grant writing workshops are offered infrequently. Even when workshops deliver high-quality instructional content, the traditional all-day format of these workshops all too often fly in the face of adult learning best practices - a huge misstep since this type of training is intended for faculty, a highly educated and sophisticated audience who have very limited time. During this case study, presenters will share how Arizona State University (ASU) is implementing a blended learning strategy that provides researchers with online instructions that can be accessed on-demand, which complement traditional in-person instructional workshops.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. List 4 key attributes of a successful faculty training program.
  2. Identify program elements that could be implemented in their own institutions with minimal effort.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Beth Moser, ABD, Instructional Design Specialist and Drew Brown, PhD, Associate Director OKED Training, Arizona State University

R10: Becoming More Involved in Society of Research Administrators International (SRA International)

This Roundtable discussion will be led by Lynda Olin (Secretary/Treasurer Western Section; co-chair of the Membership Committee and President of the PNW Chapter) and Bill Hoffman (Northeast President). Two experienced SRA International Section Officers and Committee Members will share their experiences on how and why they became more involved with SRA International. They will discuss the benefits of being more active in SRA International and describe the networking connections that each have made. If you are interested in becoming more involved in your Society, either at a Chapter, Section, or SRA International Committee level, please stop by, meet some officers  and learn more.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. A question & answer session with two SRAI Section Officers.
  2. To get more attendees involved in SRAI Committees and Volunteering Opportunities.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

William Hoffman, MAS, Department Administrator, University of Maryland Baltimore, Dental School and Lynda Olin, Proposal Development Coordinator, Office of Academic Affairs Washington State University Vancouver

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 9:15am to 10:30am

LC10: Motivating Reluctant, Inactive or Inexperienced Investigators to Pursue Grants

In recent years competition for grants has intensified for many reasons, causing investigators at all career levels to become reluctant, discouraged or inactive in seeking support for their research. New investigators face their own challenges in getting that first award.  This session will offer an overview of characteristics of reluctant, inactive, inexperienced or discouraged researchers that deter them from pursuing grant funding. Based on a literature review and best practices, an array of strategies and solutions will be offered, including incentives, mentoring, partnering, targeted workshops, and individual strategic plans for research funding. Participants are encouraged to share examples and case studies of their own best practices for motivating and working with these investigators. The session will be interactive and participatory for research administrators from all types of institutions.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe characteristics of inactive researchers at all career levels.
  2. List an array of strategies to encourage grant participation from investigators at all academic and career levels.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marjorie Piechowski, PhD, Emerita Director of Research Support, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

LC15: Networking for Professional Development

Networks are groups of people with some common interest who share knowledge and assist each other in some way. Many of these networks are formed with little to no effort and some networks are already established, such as Society of Research Administrators (SRA) International. However active networking involves seeking out individuals and establishing mutually beneficial relationships with them.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. How to develop and build your own professional network.
  2. Why the first objective is important for your career and development goals.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kathy Harris, Director, Office of Sponsored Projects, March of Dimes Foundation

T101: Blaze the Trails to Your Future Professional Development

Leadership in the ever-changing field of research administration is essential to institutional, organizational and personal growth. Institutions need qualified individuals who are current with policies and procedures and can provide the best service to faculty. Professional organizations like Society of Research Administrators (SRA) International need trailblazers that can continue to grow the field and make SRA the industry leader in content delivery. Attendees will learn how contributing in these areas can help research administrators develop into nationally recognized innovators in the field.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Walk away with the ability to use those skills to strengthen and fortify institutional goals.
  2. Learn how to become more involved with SRA International so they will step into the organizational leadership with confidence and build their professional portfolio.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Dominic Esposito, CRA, Director of Sponsored Programs and Research, Baruch College; Ellen Zavala, Director of Research Services and Outreach, University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Rene Hearns, Center Manager/Study Coordinator/Budget Analyst, IIRECC US Department of Veterans Affairs

T102: What’s Up with the Common Rule and Single Institutional Review Board (IRB) Regulation Changes and What do Research Administrators Need to Know?

The Common Rule is a basic floor of protections that has covered federally-funded research since 1991 with very few revisions. After over five years of proposed rule-making and public comment periods, the “final rule” was signed into law on January 18, 2017. Change in the revised common rule impact the scope of the law, exemption categories, Institutional Review Board (IRB) operations, and informed consent.  These new rules can have implications at all levels of research: organization leadership, grants and contracts, investigators, and department research administrators.  Research administrators and institutional leadership will receive valuable information during this session regarding the requirement of Single IRB review, IRB reliance agreements, the definition of research and scope requirements of their institutions.  Those that work directly with human research participants will also learn more about the impacts of the consent process.  Because of uncertainty during the transition of presidential administration, there has been confusion about new laws and regulations.  This will be discussed and clarified so that institutions and their research teams are prepared to be compliant, regardless of the status of the regulation.

Certificate: NIH-R, Category: III. Compliance

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the changes to the common rule that will be in effect as of 1/19/18 – 1/20/20.
  2. Describe new requirements of informed consent outlined by the final rule.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Russ Price, Federal Compliance Manager, Utah State University, Office Of Compliance Assistance

T103: Understanding Subrecipient Monitoring

This session will discuss the exciting project that the Federal Demonstration Partnership (FDP) has been undertaking to assist research institutions with the requirements of subrecipient entity monitoring and risk assessment. The overall goal of this Pilot is to reduce administrative burden for both the PassThrough Entity and the Subrecipient Entity. Information about the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse Pilot will be shared including information about the origin of the Pilot, steps taken to develop the current Pilot, the new web based version of the clearinghouse, future phases of the Pilot as well as information about how institutions can benefit from the Pilot, even if they are not part of it or an FDP member institution.

Certificate: FM-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the purpose, goals and schedule for the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse Pilot.
  2. Learn how their institution might benefit from the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse Pilot, even if they are not an FDP member institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

John Sites, Manager, Huron Consulting Group

T104: There’s a Policy for That – or There Should Be? Issues with Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)

This session will present a case study in what can happen when Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) are not followed.  Further presentation and discussion will address the advantages and disadvantages of SOPs.  We will also offer an alternative approach using best practices and discuss when one has an advantage over the other.  Audience participation is encouraged.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Determine when SOPs are necessary and when they can get in the way.
  2. Understand the difference between SOP and best practices.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Gayle Walters, MS, Associate Director, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

T105: Public Access Policy: Accelerating the Delivery of Tomorrow's Advancements

This workshop provides an overview of how grant-funded publications are managed to ensure an accurate and up-to-date list of publications (bibliography) that meets National Institutes of Health (NIH) requirements for grant applications, progress reports, and public access. It also provides and overview of setting up My National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), My Bibliography, adding new publications, linking My NCBI account to an Electronic Research Administration (eRA) Commons account and grants. This will be a hands on workshop. Please bring your laptop or electronic device to connect directly with My NCBI.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand what is My NCBI. Accessing, registering, creating, linking and managing publications.
  2. Understanding the four methods and what submission method to use.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Timothy Schailey,  MS, Director, Research Administration, Thomas Jefferson University; Erin Bailey, Chief Financial Officer, CTSI and Erin O’Byrne, Research Administrator, University of Buffalo

T106: Post-Submission to Award Acceptance

The pre-award office is responsible for dealing with a variety of issues that arise after proposal submission and lead to acceptance of the award. The pre-award administrator should be able to deal with publication restrictions, intellectual property, indemnification, facilities and administrative costs questions, and know how to address such special situations as international agreements and JIT requirements. The session will identify troublesome clauses and discuss how to determine what to accept and what to reject, and other difficult contract review topics.

Certificate: PA-R

Certificate: IRAM-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Review different types of award terms and conditions, including Federal Acquisition Regulations and different grants policy manuals.
  2. Negotiate acceptance of awards.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Renee Vaughan, MDiv, MA, CRA, Financial Practice Manager, Duke University SoM and Monique Gregory, MRA, Research Administrator, University of Central Florida, College of Health & Public Affairs

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

T201: Research Administrator as a Change Agent

Our institutions are constantly changing, whether due to external sources—such as sponsor rules and regulations—or internal factors—like senior leadership, faculty, and students needs and priorities. As research administrators, we pride ourselves on our adaptability and flexibility in the face of this near-constant change. But what if instead of managing this type of change, we led it?  Research administrators facilitate research, inspire, inform, and engage on a daily basis. With this skill set, and from our unique perspective in an institutional setting, we also make excellent change agents. In this session, we will discuss the merits of, and ways to become, a change agent at your institution. We’ll walk through a case study in which a research administration enterprise was completely reimagined from within. Then, using lessons learned from this process, we’ll discuss do-it-yourself tools for creating change in your own department, school or center, and institution.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe why research administrators make excellent change agents, and in what areas our skill set best applies.
  2. Develop discreet strategies for management of external and internal change.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Zoya Davis-Hamilton, CRA, EDD, Director, Research Administration Initiatives and Sarah Marina, Assistant Director, Research Development and Research Administration, Tufts University

T202: Grant Development for Graduate Students: Departmental, College and University-level Training Methods

How can we train graduate students when there is so much else to do in an [insert name of office here? This presentation will pose the opposite question – how can you not? Based on training conducted within a school of social science and in partnership with multiple central units of a research university, this session will cover four topics: why? The presenter will discuss how graduate training enhances institutional efficiency and success; how? Numerous training methods will be introduced; what? Four categories of training topics will be discussed, including how to blend and tailor topics fit different situations; and who: Potential audiences and partners will be addressed, focusing on opportunities for interdisciplinary, intra-institutional training. This session will contribute new insights regarding the importance of fostering grant training for graduate students, as an often overlooked yet inexpensive method for contributing to the overall success of research institutions.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify methods and topics for training graduate students in grant development for sponsored projects.
  2. Brainstorm potential training partners for graduate-level grant instruction across their institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Christina Leigh Deitz, MLS, DPS-IM, Grant Development Administrator, Syracuse University Maxwell School

T203: A Frank Discussion on Service Centers

Institutions usually establish a variety of service units to provide specific services to support their sponsored research, instruction and other activities. These service operations are referred to as service centers and are categorized as specialized service facilities or recharge centers. This session will describe the differences between the two types of service centers provide examples for each category and, review the federal regulations that affect service center operations. Our focus will include the federal government’s concerns related to service center operations. Development of both federal and non-federal billing rates, and institutional service center policies, procedures and practices will be discussed. Service center operations, funding, and benefits at a major research institution will also be explored in this session along with where to gather data and get a handle on what all of an institution’s service centers may encompass.

Certificate: FM-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Attendees will gain an understanding of the federal requirements regarding service centers and how service centers develop user fees, bill users and function at institutions of higher education.
  2. Attendees will gain an appreciation of the benefits, challenges, responsibilities and costs of creating and operating service centers at a major research institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Deston Halverson, Senior Manager, Higher Education and Academic Medical Centers, Attain, LLC and Sara Bible, Associate Vice Provost, Research Administration, Stanford University

T204: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Update

Don’t miss this opportunity to hear about what is new and being developed within the National Institute of Health's (NIH) programs, policies, and budgets.  In this comprehensive review participants will learn about the newest policy updates and how their respective institutions may be impacted. Upon completion of the presentation, participants will have the opportunity to ask questions about new and existing policies and procedures.  Topics include recent and upcoming changes to NIH policy, compliance requirements, and so much more!

Certificate: IRAM-E

Certificate: NIH-E

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will learn about NIH's budget priorities.
  2. Participants will learn about new policies and compliance initiatives.
  3. Participants will gain insight into current issues at NIH.

Prerequisites: Participants should come with a basic knowledge of NIH.

Speaker(s):

Melinda Nelson, Acting Director, Division of Extramural Research Activities and Chief Grants Management Officer, NIAMS, NIH

T205: On the Same Page: Project Initiation Meetings

Does your institution provide limited administrative support to Principal Investigators (PI) and require them to have a more active role in project management? The Rochester Institute of Technology has instituted a Project Initiation Meeting (PIM) in order to ensure all parties start on the same page. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the terms and conditions; compliance and reporting requirements; roles and responsibilities (PI, Research Office, Accounting/Finance staff, etc.); University related policies, procedures and compliance issues; and changes to the project since submission (project dates, personnel, budgeted rates, etc.). PIM attendees receive a Terms and Conditions Summary document which summarizes a variety of information including applicable general and specific award conditions and important dates. PI signature is required to acknowledge their understanding and acceptance of the project requirements. This session will discuss the genesis of, continued evolution, usefulness, and importance of this university-wide tool in assisting with project management and compliance.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the benefits of conducting this type of meeting, determine content, identify key meeting participants for their institution.
  2. Assess applicability to their institution, determine considerations for development and implementation, and adoption as a best practice.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Nicholas Rogers, MBA, Senior Grants and Contracts Specialist, Rochester Institute of Technology

T206: Clinical Trial Budget Negotiation Challenges: It's Your Cost of Doing Business

Clinical trial budgets are always negotiable. Still, many investigators and clinical teams accept original budgets proposed by industry sponsors. The process of budgetary negotiation may seem intimidating, overwhelming, or ungrateful. In reality, negotiation allows both the sponsor and the site to arrive at a consensus which will benefit both sides. With an acceptable budget the site is more likely to fully commit to subject enrollment and site compliance by allocating proper resources and effort, which will result in producing higher quality data. Trial success can be easily compromised when budgets are negotiated poorly or accepted with no negotiation at all. Who is the right negotiator at the site level? How to muster sufficient negotiation power? When to push back and what to forgo? These and other questions will be addressed in the course of the session. The participants will discuss practical negotiation tips and techniques. Actual budget negotiation examples will be used to reveal most common stumbling blocks between sites and sponsors and the ways to circumvent them.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Utilize various budget negotiation tips and techniques.
  2. Define the role of budget negotiation in trial success.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Pavel Kruchek,  MBA, Director, Business Operations, Clinical Trials Office and Vanessa Bryant, Sr. Budget Analyst, Clinical Trials Office, University of Utah

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 1:45pm to 3:00pm

T301: Engaging Challenging Staff: Techniques for the Emerging Leader

Life is complex and employees are juggling work, family, and personal life. Frequently, personal issues and concerns negatively influence employee engagement and performance. How should leaders overseeing research administration offices engage employees while setting and meeting goals? This interactive session will explore the ways leadership styles and employee engagement interact. By incorporating best practices in human relations, emerging research administration leaders will be able to more adeptly inspire and create confident employees.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify ways to resolve inter-personal conflict, motivate, and build win-win relationships with employees.
  2. Identify ways to resolve inter-personal conflict, motivate, and build win-win relationships with employees.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kortnay Woods, PhD, Executive Director of Grants and Sponsored Research, The College of New Jersey

T302: Collaborative Research and the Role of the Scientist in Society

A variety of collaborative relationships in research amongst academia, industry, government and society result in different roles for the researcher. Whether viewed as a "discoverer of new knowledge”, an “independent authority”, or a “deliverer of tangible goods”, researchers often face conflicting agendas while striving to ensure scientific objectivity and ethical decision-making in their work. Research Administrators can become more effective and productive in their work and interactions with researchers by better understanding these differing roles and dynamics. This presentation will discuss some of these conflicting agendas, the different roles of researchers, how the practice of science is affected, and how the training of new researchers and staff members are impacted.  NOTE:  Use of an electronic audience response system will further engage participants and foster discussion of this interesting topic.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Attendees will gain a better understanding of a variety of ethical issues encountered by researchers from collaborative relationships between academia, industry, government and society.
  2. Attendees will be better able to identify and respond to the tensions, challenges and expectations researchers face in different collaborative relationships in science.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tony Onofrietti, M.S., CRSS, Director, Research Education, The University of Utah

T303: Budgeting Basics

This session focuses on the theory of what is a good budget and the practical, what are the pieces and how to create a budget. The session will include a discussion of cost principles, budget categories, direct and indirect costs, cost sharing and how to create a budget for a sponsored project.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: I. Fundamentals of Sponsored Research Projects

Certificate: PA-E

Certificate: FM-E

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify basic principles used in budgeting
  2. Identify various budget categories, determine allowable and unallowable expenses.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Sharon McCarl, MBA, CRA, Associate Dean, Mellon College of Science, Carnegie Mellon University

T304: Enhancing Your Research Administrative Model: The Art of Unleashing the Hidden Potential

After identifying several academic department challenges including competing priorities, turnover, lack of training, HR issues, audit issues, and lack of development plans, Johns Hopkins University (JHU) leadership formed a research work group to address these concerns. With the large size of our decentralized institution, we developed four subcommittees to concentrate on each category- HR, training, metrics, and recruitment. The subcommittee with an immediate impact was the training committee with their formation of a Fundamentals of Sponsored Programs Boot Camp. We will discuss the development and lessons learned based on our experiences. Other initiatives included rolling out a centralized model built upon best practices identified through a method known as Lean Sigma.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identifying problems and driving improvements for common grant management issues.
  2. Standardizing research administration by successfully tapping and leveraging internal resources.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kevin Fogarty, Sr. Director of Finance, Johns Hopkins Universiy School of Medicine; Alex Galea, Assistant Administrator; Laura Noffke, Research Resource Development Associate and Amanda Casper, Research Service Manager, Johns Hopkins University

T305: Indirect Cost Rates – A Non-profit Perspective

Almost every research institution must engage in the process of negotiating federal indirect rates. Non-profits face unique challenges in preparing, submitting and negotiating indirect rates. As we go through this process, many of us often wonder if we’ve done everything we can do within the constraints of federal regulations in order to maximize our institution’s negotiated indirect rate and resulting indirect cost recovery. In this session, we will discuss strategies that may be employed to maximize indirect cost recovery, both in the preparation of your indirect rate proposal as well as during the subsequent rate negotiation and budgeting of indirect costs on grants and contracts. Participants will be encouraged to share their experiences concerning the indirect rate process. We will also discuss the impact that the new Uniform Guidance will have on preparing and negotiating indirect rates and what participants are doing to prepare for these changes.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: IV. Financial Management and Compliance

Certificate: FM-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify what an indirect cost rate is, its importance and the various types of costs recovered through the indirect rate.
  2. Explore different types of rates and how they impact recovery and understand the process for preparing, submitting and negotiating the rate under the Uniform Guidance.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Alex Weekes, CPA, PARTNER, ML WEEKES & COMPANY, PC

T306: Leading the US Research Investment towards Finding a Cure for Alzheimer’s Disease

With the 2011 National Alzheimer's Project Act, research aimed at a cure for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias became a national priority, and a National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease was established. At the direction of Congress, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) develops an annual professional judgment budget to estimate the funds needed to fully pursue scientific opportunities to meet the research goal of the Plan—to effectively treat and prevent Alzheimer's and related dementias by 2025. Biomedical studies and care and services research are addressed in the budget estimate. The professional judgment budget is also called a "bypass budget" because it is submitted to the President and then to Congress, without modification through the traditional Federal budget process. It includes a set of targeted milestones and an estimate of the additional investment needed in fiscal year (FY) 2018, above the base for Alzheimer's and related dementias in the President's FY 2017 budget to help NIH—and the Nation—move forward to end the devastation of dementia. The bypass budget also highlights recent NIH-supported basic, translational, and clinical research—a wealth of studies that are helping us better understand, diagnose, prevent, and treat Alzheimer's and related dementias.

Certificate: NIH-E

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the funding opportunities available for attendees to influence grant submissions to the NIA.
  2. The NIA budget increased 33.5% for AD related research. Operating a research organization during rapid growth presents challenges and opportunities. Attendees will understand the NIA business model.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Patrick Shirdon, MS, Chief Business Officer, National Institute on Aging

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

LC11: Hot Topics Related to Your Human Research Protections Program (HRPP) and the Institutional Review Board (IRB)

A Human Research Protections Program (HRPP) , which includes the Institutional Review Board (IRB), is the mechanism by which an institution protects subjects participating in human research. There are many issues related to human subjects research  that a Research Administrator must be aware of to effectively and efficiently interact with departmental faculty in their role as a Principal Investigator or sub-investigator. This Learning Café will focus on Hot Topics related to IRBs  HRPPs and the role of the Research Administrators in IRB reliance agreements, compliance activities (routine and for-cause audits; investigator self assessments), AAHRPP accreditation, and IRB and HRPP processes (pre/post award).

 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Attendees will be able to discuss a wide range of IRB issues (pre and post award) relevant to departmental faculty conducting human subjects research.
  2. Attendees will understand their department's role in the institution's HRPP.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Julie Doherty, MSN, RN, CIP, Director, Regulatory Compliance, Office of Academic Affairs, Human Research Protections Office, University of Maryland Baltimore

T401: Getting Your Principal Investigator to Yes: Negotiating Agreement for Organizational Transformation

Many have come to the conclusion that it is difficult to get investigators to change. This can result in frustration when new processes and systems are being implemented to improve efficiencies and reduce institutional risks. In this session we will talk about what makes many investigators resistant to change and tactics that can be used to get their buy in when implementing new processes and/or systems at institutions.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe the obstacles that make investigators resistant to change.
  2. Identify the process of determining stakeholders' value and using it to "negotiate" positive changes to processes.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kevin Ferrell, CRA, Solutions Consultant, Evisions and Anne Schauer, Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, Miami University

T402: Embedded, Just-in-time Training in Research Administration Systems

Arizona State University (ASU) recently deployed a new electronic research administration system with an aggressive schedule. Electronic research administration systems help the research administrator submit and track proposals more efficiently. Yet, delivering training on electronic research administration systems is tricky. Training workshops can provide an overview of new software, but are problematic as they are not only time-intensive but also require learners to apply what they learned at a later time on their own. Meanwhile, traditional online help or software documentation is ineffective in helping users learn and troubleshoot new technology. At ASU, we tackled this problem by developing and delivering “embedded instruction,” online training that is embedded within our electronic research administration system. This approach provides seamless instruction and help to the user at the exact moment that training is needed, or “just in time.” Using a case study of how we delivered training at ASU, presenters will share strategies and best practices for delivering technology training to research administrators.

Certificate: PA-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Cite 3 characteristics of effective training on electronic research administration.
  2. Identify the advantages of “just in time” assistance vs. traditional training.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Drew Brown, PhD, Associate Director and Beth Moser, Instructional Design Specialist, Arizona State Unviersity

T403: Closeout of National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grants

This session will provide an overview of all National Institutes of Health (NIH) closeout policies and procedures as well as discuss strategies and best practices for proactive compliance. 

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: IV. Financial Management and Compliance

Certificate: FM-E

Certificate: NIH-R, Category: II. Post-award

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Be familiar with the NIH Closeout process.
  2. Identify strategies for using the Commons closeout module to pro-actively ensure timely reporting.
  3. Identify best practices for closing out grants.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Melinda Nelson, Acting Director, Division of Extramural Research Activities and Chief Grants Management Officer, NIAMS, NIH

T404: 1,000,001 University Rules to Follow; Tips for Managing Your Department's Grant

This step-by-step 75-minute presentation will focus on how to successfully manage and maintain a grant and budget awarded to a university department while adhering to federal, state, and university policy and procedures. The American Sign Language and Interpreter Education department at Eastern Kentucky University has been awarded various grants over the past 20 plus years. Amy Milcznski, the interim Associate Chair, and Lorna Grubb, who has worked for the department as the Budget Specialist for the past 15 years, will share strategies and approaches to post-award grant management. This session will briefly discuss overarching Federal and State policies and procedures as outlined in the Office of Management and Budget Uniform Guidance. The primary focus of this presentation will outline daily procedures and processes that will aide participants in organizing and overseeing grant funds. Presenters will share practical strategies for implementing maintenance of thorough records to stay in compliance for clean audit trails. This session will also detail and present efficient and effective records management at a departmental level. Topics covered: records management, database usage, justification, expenditure tracking, and standard operating procedures for a budget office.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Integrate practical application of organizational techniques.
  2. Assess their institutional needs and develop budget formats to ensure clean audits.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Amy Milcznski, MA, Interim Associate Chair and Lorna Grubb, Budget Specialist, Eastern Kentucky University

T405: Thriving in Departmental Cultures: Strategies from the Trenches

Although departmental work is fundamentally the same anywhere, anyone who has worked in multiple departments can tell you that each and every location can be very different - even within the same institution. From differences in internal policies, to training infrastructures, to unique tools and systems, the Research Administrator needs to embrace the culture of his or her individual department in order to help it thrive, but can also influence that culture and make it work with his or her own. This discussion session will encourage people to share their own tips and tricks for departmental work in addition to discussing various tools (databases, shadow systems, etc.) that the presenters have developed and used in multiple departments.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Compare strategies for supporting research in departmental roles.
  2. Identify and analyze shortfalls in current practices, while discussing options and avenues for improvement; analyze various technological solutions to common problems and department-specific tools/systems used; share tips and tricks learned.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Heidi Kendig, M Ed (Higher Ed Administration), Senior Financial Administrator, MIT and Kate Mollen,  Associate, Higher Education Consulting, Huron Consulting Group

T406: Intellectual Property Issues in Clinical Trial Agreements (CTAs)

This session will identify common intellectual property issues that arise when negotiating agreements for clinical research; examine these issues are they appear in typical (and atypical) contract terms; and discuss strategies for negotiating these terms from a University perspective.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify troublesome intellectual property terms as they appear in CTAs.
  2. Develop strategies to negotiate these terms to reduce overall risk to Universities.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tom Burns, JD, MBA, Director, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 9:00am to 10:15am

LC12: The Pre-award to Post-award Connection

Pre-award administrators are usually recognized by faculty for working tirelessly on a proposal, often at the very last minute, both when the grant is submitted and upon notification of award. Many post-award administrators see a challenging road ahead when an agency funds a project and are often in the unenviable position of citing policy that the Principal Investigator may not have known when submitting the proposal.  This learning café will bring together pre- and post-award administrators to discuss best practices that will effectively streamline the submission to award lifecycle and avoid setbacks such as delays in project start-up.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify potential delays in proposal startup.
  2. Propose solutions to ensure a smooth pre-award to post-award transition.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jane Dumsha, PhD, Chief Research Operations Officer, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and Dominic Esposito, Director of Sponsored Programs and Research, Baruch College

LC13: Creating a Better Working Relationship between the Researcher Administrator and the Researcher

As research administrators we work with many personalities. It can become somewhat intimidating while working with researchers who spend their time writing manuscripts, teaching, attending meetings, presenting their findings, and performing an infinite amount of tasks on a daily basis that we aren’t privy to. It is understandable that the researcher can become frustrated when we make an additional request. It might be a pending form that is required for a submission or a document to issue a payment. How do we approach the researcher with our request and when is the right time to do so? There isn’t necessarily a right or wrong answer but we want to know what you think. How do you engage the researcher? We have seen time and time again that meeting the researcher in their work area allows them the opportunity to share what they do and it provides them the sense that we care about their research. We need to understand what they are doing and how their research is beneficial to the future medicine. Every institution has those hard to deal with researcher who have barriers and are defensive with every suggestion and or request you make. It is important to make them understand why we are here. We are here to protect the institution and the researchers. How can we get our point across? Are there any suggestions? Customer service surveys can also allow your customers, in this case the researcher to provide feedback on how you and I can improve the office. We need to be open to criticism and we need to understand that the research community are our customers and it is up to us to make their experience as easy as possible. Are there things that you can do to better? We must be open to suggestions. A survey can allow us to understand the needs of our research community. Another option to provide a relationship between a research administrator and a researcher is through an event hosted by your office. Given the opportunity to engage with your customers in a platform where they feel relaxed, introduce yourself, and share with them what assistance you provide to them. Are there examples of what you or your institution is doing to bridge the relationship? At our institution we host a bi-annual two day symposium where the researchers are invited to share a little bit of their research. We get to see our Principal Investigator (PI)’s and research community in a different environment and they get to express what they are passionate about. At this forum we get to introduce ourselves and give them the opportunity to meet us in a setting where we get to have a chat about everything and anything. This face to face interaction creates a better working relationship.  Other discussion may take place in regards to the common problems we run into as a research administrator and what suggestions we all have.  Examples of what each of us have experienced can provide for an interactive discussion group.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe how other organizations develop a good relationship with their research community.
  2. Evaluate the current processes in their own organization and obtain ideas that may beneficial.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jessica  Portillo, MBA, CRA, Senior Financial Analyst and Kimberly Askew, Senior Financial Analyst, Loma Linda University

LC14: Anatomy of the Development Plan

Fundraisers do it, you should too! Do you have specific goals and strategies in place to secure financial support? While it’s important to respond to Request for Proposal's (RFP’s) and RO1’s (NIH Award Type) , being proactive and creating a development plan will result in less headaches and late nights working on grant applications.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

Provide key steps to creating a development plan that will allow you to manage the process instead of the process managing you.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kathy Harris, Director, Office of Sponsored Projects, March of Dimes Foundation

W101: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Research Training Awards (K Awards) and National Research Service Awards (NRSA)

Academic and research institutions thrive on the contributions of the young and new investigators that create the foundations of the future generations of successful academics and scientists. In order to encourage the new talented pool of scientists, NIH has designed the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (NRSA) and the Research Career Development Awards or K awards. The purpose of these grants is to create a new generation of young scientists, and to help the promising new or junior investigators to provide research support with specialized training, mentoring, protected time and resources to achieve research independence at the end of the award duration.

In this session we will review and discuss the eligibility, requirements, and various approaches and strategies to be successful to receive these awards, guidelines and tips about how to design the NRSA and K grant applications and pitfalls to avoid. In addition, we will discuss how to find these opportunities, build teams, develop budgets, and prepare competitive future proposals to become successful, independent scientists.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Certificate: NIH-E

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the types of NRSA and K-grant support and their requirements.                                                                  
  2. Better provide guidance to staff and potential recipients of NRSA and K-awards.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Debbie Pettitt, Senior Grants Management Specialist, National Institutes of Health and Dhanonjoy C  Saha, PhD, Director, Office of Grant Support

W102: You Want to Do What? Investigator-initiated Clinical Research

We all have those investigators that are inspired, sometimes in the middle of night, to do amazing research projects. They are ambitious. They will add to the knowledge to possibly change practice. The investigators usually want to get it done yesterday. We want to help them. What are the steps we need to take to be sure that the investigators can carry out the study while protecting the participants and the institution? This session will cover the areas that need to be considered when an investigator enters into a clinical research study that he/she sponsors.

Content level: Advanced

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify investigator responsibilities in clinical research.
  2. Outline ways to manage the oversight institutions inherit when managing investigator-initiated clinical trials.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tonya Edvalson, CCRP, Regulatory Coordinator II, Intermountain Healthcare

W103: Understanding the Contract Lifecyle

This session will provide the participant with an overview of the life cycle from Request for Proposal (RFP) to award closeout on federal and non-federal contracts. In addition, the session will address some of the problematic language associated with the terms and conditions when accepting these awards. At the end of the session, a participant should have a general understanding of how the contract process works and associated complex terms.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: II.Legal Issues in Research Administration

Certificate: FM-E

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will learn how to administer a federal sponsored research contract from RFP to award in a university environment.
  2. Learn best practices and tips for managing contract funds.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Rebecca Hunsanker, Director of Research Administration; Monique Anderson, Director Administrative Services and Debra Murray, Assistant Director of Compliance, University of Maryland, College Park

W104: Human Resources Management and Best Practices for the Department Administrator

This session will cover all aspects of Human Resources Management for the Department Administrator. This session will explore all pre-employment processes and best practices for the Administrator to get highly qualified candidates into their workplace. This session will also cover various payroll and equity issues that the Department Administrator may encounter. This will be a very interactive session between the participants and presenter and use various "what is wrong with this case study scenarios" to get everyone discussing how Human Resources Management is practiced at various Universities/Institutes. The session will also cover hot topics such as grievance/conflict resolution, VISA/International worker issues, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), performance evaluations, mentoring, Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), on-boarding and supervision styles/issues.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Use best practices and case studies to assist the Department Administrator become a more effective manager.
  2. Understand Human Resource Management issues more clearly and how these issues are resolved by various Universities/Institutes.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

William Hoffman, MAS, Department Administrator, UMB--Dental School and  Nancy Bowers, Director of Finance & Administration, Dean's Office University of Maryland Baltimore School of Pharmacy

W105: VA Research: Why You Should be in Business with Us

Partnering with the VA research is a unique opportunity.  This session will outline the value the VA can provide to your research programs.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. How to work with the VA.
  2. The proven innovations from VA research.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Edward Black, Executive Director, Denver Research Institute (DRI) and Rebecca Rosales, MBA, Executive Director, Northern California Institute for Research and Education, Inc.

W106: Let's Talk Story: Financial/Logistical Lessons Learned from Opening the National Cancer Institute (NCI)'s MATCH Trial

Offering biopsy-driven precision medicine clinical trials comes with significant administrative complexities, both clinical and non-clinical in nature. The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-MATCH trial, a federally funded precision medicine trial analyzes patients’ tumors for genetic abnormalities for which a targeted drug exists. Patients with an ‘actionable mutation’ are assigned to one of 24 possible treatment arms. This trial is targeted for cancer patients who have advanced solid tumors and lymphomas that are no longer responding (or never responded) to standard therapy. The Queen’s Medical Center (QMC), a private, non-profit, acute care medical facility serving the State of Hawaii, opened the NCI-MATCH trial as part of the statewide Hawaii Cancer Consortium. The opening of this trial at QMC required coordination among the hospital, employed physicians and clinical staff, private practice physicians, multiple clinical partners (e.g., radiologists, pathologists, laboratories) and the University of Hawaii Cancer Center. This case study will present ‘lessons learned’ in the opening of the NCI-MATCH trial, highlighting the importance of educating and coordinating all parties in regards to the trial logistics, protocol requirements, and research billing. In addition, there will be discussion on the overall challenge of trial reimbursement and the dispersing of limited lump sum federal funds among separate entities. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the clinical logistical challenges of opening the NCI-MATCH trial, a biopsy-driven precision medicine trial.
  2. Identify the non-clinical challenges (e.g. research billing, trial funding limitations) involved in opening the  NCI-MATCH trial within a hospital setting that utilizes community clinical partners (e.g. pathology, radiology).

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Erin Fukaya, Clinical Research Associate, The University of Hawaii Cancer Center; Kate Bryant-Greenwood, JD, Research Coordinator; Rebecca Ohta, Manager Research Regulatory Office and Jennifer Kimbell, PhD, Manager Oncology Support Services, The Queen's Medical Center

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

W201: The National Science Foundation (NSF) Proposal Process: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

This session will provide everything you need to know about preparing and submitting a proposal to the National Science Foundation (NSF). Learn about the different types of funding opportunities that NSF employs, where to find the relevant policies governing proposal preparation, merit review, and special guidelines for other topical areas such as conference, RAPID, EAGER and RAISE proposals.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will understand what to look for in an NSF funding opportunity.
  2. Participants will learn about all the required components of an NSF proposal.
  3. Participants will understand what they may and may not include as part of an NSF proposal.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Samantha Hunter, Senior Policy Specialist, National Science Foundation

W202: Anatomy and Physiology of Sponsored Awards

This session will cover the components of grants and contracts, distinguish between gifts and awards, reveal various funding sources and explain the implications of "strings attached or unattached." Introduction to Research Administration and Management (IRAM) Certificate Session.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: II.Legal Issues in Research Administration

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to determine if funding is a gift or a grant.
  2. Participants will be able to identify various parts of a grant or contract.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Nancy Cruikshank, CRA Director of Grants, Research and Sponsored Programs, Slippery Rock University and Yvonne Brewster, Manager, Research Administration and Finance Departments of Anesthesiology and Surgery, University of Pittsburgh

W203: Effort Reporting: Understanding the Requirements

Effort reporting is a continual area of focus for Offices of Inspectors General and the Justice Department and is a constant hot topic within the research community. Federal regulations and guidance in this important area are often vague and open to varying interpretations. This session will review recent audit and investigation findings related to effort reporting, discuss common pitfalls/red flags for auditors and offer some best practices on how to avoid them. Among the topics that will be covered in this session are effort reporting fundamentals, as well as some of the more challenging aspects of effort reporting, including what’s in and what’s out of institutional base salary and total professional effort, supplemental compensation, what constitutes a “suitable means of verification” and what exactly is an “independent internal evaluation” of the effort reporting process. Additionally, the presenters will address any changes enacted by the A-21 Task Force.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: IV. Financial Management and Compliance

Certificate: FM-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the federal requirements of effort reporting and identify industry best practices for designing and implementing an effective effort reporting process.
  2. Learn what federal auditors and investigators look for when auditing effort reporting, and techniques to mitigate risks of non-compliance at your institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Libre' McAdory, Administrative Director School of Medicine Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore and Lisa Campbell, Associate Administrator for Finance and Research Operations, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins

W204: Effective Leadership Skills for Research Administrators and Clinical Supervisors

Today's leadership landscape is dynamic with an unpredictable plethora of regulations and budgetary restrictions. Research Administrators and Clinical Supervisors, namely those in administrative and management roles, need a wide range of operational, relational, and analytical skills to effectively carry out their responsibilities. This session will provide information on being an effective leader, doing their jobs well and identifying how leadership skills can directly affect the quality of the performance of staff.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Define the traits of effective leadership; How to approach leadership proactively.
  2. Describe methods of assessing various leadership styles; How to effectively apply leadership principles as a research administrator and/or clinical supervisor.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Timothy Schailey, MS, Director, Research Administration, Thomas Jefferson University, Erin Bailey, Chief Financial Officer CTSI, University at Buffalo and Sarah Danna, Staff Assistant, Family Medicine, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

W205: Building a Bridge: The Importance of Forming and Enhancing Relationships

Institutions vary in size, grant activity, resources and needs. It is essential for research administrators to work collectively and “build the bridge” with the various bodies that support the research infrastructure, as we are all on the same team striving for a common goal. The City University of New York (CUNY) is a large university system that consists of 24 colleges. Research Administrators in these colleges must work with several entities to accomplish their goals. Oversight by the university, the colleges and a fiscal agent must be sustained. Efficiencies in research compliance requirements, legal requirements, grant personnel, cost sharing, effort reporting, limited submissions, obtaining funding sources and professional development are some matters that can be complicated. In this session, attendees will learn how these entities work collaboratively to get the job done. We will also share ideas, tips, advice and lessons learned on how to leverage resources and knowledge. 

Certificate: IRAM-E

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify and explore new strategies and ideas to ensure an efficient pre- and post-award process.
  2. Identify how to leverage resources and knowledge to build the bridge.  Learn effective techniques to form and enhance these relationships.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Carolynn Julien, Associate Director, Hunter College of CUNY and Melisa Mendez, Associate Director, Baruch College of CUNY

W206: That National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grant is in Trouble: Houston We Have a Problem

Can you identify the telltale signs of a grant with problems? What do you do when you see them? With examples from National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants, multiple case studies will be used to illustrate warning signs with research grants in trouble and to suggest solutions to correct (or at least mitigate) problems at early as possible.

Certificate: NIH-R, Category: II. Post-award

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Recognize indicators of problems with a research grant.
  2. Describe possible solutions to specific problems identified with research grants.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Theresa Jarosik, Supervisory Grants Management Officer, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)