Sponsored Programs Planning, Development and Deliveries (SP)

This track relates to the development and delivery of sponsored programs. Topics may include: how to develop collaborative partnerships with industry, government and non-profit sectors; identifying strategies in developing public-private partnerships; institutional capacity building, including supply-side partnerships; faculty, positioning; effective grant writing techniques; the role of the research administrator in sponsored programs development; diversifying funding sources;  communication strategies in sponsored programs development; and organizational and team structures to support successful program development.

Sunday, April 2, 2017

WS3: Proposal Development
Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 9:00am to 12:30pm

Content level: Basic

"It is well established that research administrators support the budgetary and compliance needs of investigators. What is less well understood are the large and growing number of additional pre-award responsibilities many of us handle at our institutions. Far from being ‘review and submit’ automaton, research administrators hold many roles. They assist new investigators in learning how to find and successfully apply for grant funding; they work with experienced investigators in updating their grant skills and knowledge; and they are seen by many faculty as their trusted partners in grant submission, the last word on all elements related to pre-award issues.

The pre-award support provided by research administrators to faculty being varied and complex, it requires deep knowledge across multiple skillsets. This support includes teaching faculty to and/or assisting faculty with:
• navigating different types of funders and proposals;
• reading and interpreting proposal guidelines efficiently and accurately;
• planning the proposal, involving timelines and checklists, partners, and cost share;
• understanding what proposal parts or sections are expected, how to best address them, and the need to relate the various sections to each other.

Working with real life case studies and hands-on activities, we’ll take you through the entire process of offering detailed and effective non-budgetary support for a faculty proposal submission. Takeaways will include: creating effective project management materials for a proposal, such as timelines, checklists, and outlines; instruction on clear and concise writing for extra-narrative elements of a proposal; high-level discussion of editing proposals for formatting, grammar, and fit with funding agency guidelines."

Certificate: PA-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Become familiar with types of proposals, learn to manage proposal submission and assist with preparation of various types of applications effectively and efficiently from a faculty-centered perspective.
  2. Interpret and address proposal guidelines, including page limits; edit requested sections for clarity and effectiveness to improve proposals' fundability, using project management tools.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Zoya Davis-Hamilton, EdD, CRA, Director, Research Administration Initiatives; Sarah Marina, Assistant Director, Research Development and Research Administration, Tufts University and Anne Schauer, MA, CRA, Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, Miami University

WS4: Localized Research Administration Support for Centers: People, Processes and Technologies
Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 9:00am to 12:30pm

Content level: Advanced

Creating innovative, unique and strategic collaborations within the university across multiple schools/colleges is growing at our university. Collaborative research projects are leading to the start-up cross-disciplinary research centers. Faculty are focused on the science. However, what may not be considered is the administrative infrastructure needed to support the successful operation of a research center. Using a dialectic approach, participants will explore the provision of end-to-end research administration support for interdisciplinary research centers and institutes from the perspective of key stakeholders, faculty, department research administrators and central office administrators. The interactive discussion will capture the pros and cons of dedicated, shared services to support research centers and institutes and the processes and technologies that may be needed to reduce faculty burden.

Learning objectives:

  1. Share and analyze challenges, and offer potential solutions, to working in a dedicated shared services environment with faculty on cross-discipline collaborative research centers.
  2. Discuss processes and technologies to support collaborative research with the potential to reduce faculty burden.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Gwynne Scheffer, MS, Assistant Director, Strategy & Faculty Support, Drexel University

WS9: Fundamentals of Building a Budget
Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 1:30pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

Developing a clear and reasonable budget is one of the most important pieces of the proposal process. The regulations tell us the budget should be the financial expression of the statement of work. The ability to build a budget that directly ties to the work being performed enhances the chances of being funded by the sponsor, and protects us in the case of an audit. Understanding how to work with PIs to craft a sound, reasonable budget and budget justification is essential to our roles as research administrators.

Certificate: PA-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Apply the principles of the Uniform Guidance (including allowability, allocability, and reasonableness, and a host of other specific issues) to the budget construction and justification process.
  2. Confidently collaborate with their faculty to build a sound budget which reflects the scope of work.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Rebecca Hunsaker, Director of Research Administration; Gaye Bugenhagen, Director of Administrative Services, Department of Sociology; Marchon Jackson, Director of Sponsored Projects Accounting and Compliance, Division of Research, University of Maryland, College Park

Monday, April 3, 2017

M102: Finding Funding Opportunities and Developing Research
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Intermediate

The new era of highly dynamic cutting edge and competitive scientific world demands more efficiency and dedication from all the research community members. Finding suitable funding opportunities is the first major step for the investigators towards achieving that goal. Research administrators properly knowledgeable in the diverse areas of scientific funding can potentially motivate the faculty members while securing the research funding of an organization. This session, therefore, will first address the eternal question: how to find desirable funding opportunities.

Grants.gov is an excellent source of finding funding opportunities for federal grants, contracts and agreements. Although federal agencies like National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Defense (DOD), etc., and especially National Institutes of Health (NIH) are the major sources of bio-medical research funding in USA, institutions cannot depend or survive solely on the federal funding for sustaining their research and academic endeavors, considering the current atmosphere of shrinking federal research budget. Many private research institutions are trying to diversify their portfolios and looking for funding from industry, private sources and foundations. To reach this goal they are relying on various portals or software to find suitable funding opportunities. Various agencies are making special matchmaking databases and search engines to develop search-based tools utilizing ""key words.""

In this session we will discuss various modes, models, portals and software available in the market that capture and assemble these opportunities (in addition to grants.gov). We will discuss how to disseminate this information to the targeted population, the investigators and administrators, effectively and efficiently for its maximum utilization and success. We will also discuss about important steps by which an organization and investigators can try to steer the federal funding to a particular direction and create funding opportunities for future.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Certificate: PA-R

Certificate: NIH-R, Category: I. Pre-award

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify funding opportunities by utilizing free- and subscription-based electronic portals.
  2. Targeted marketing or best practices and standard mechanisms for communicating the opportunities to interested parties.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Dhanonjoy C  Saha, PhD, Director, Office of Grant Support, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

M202: Building and Enhancing the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Pipeline
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Intermediate

Much recent data on enrollment of U.S. citizens in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines show a continuing need to increase the numbers of women and underrepresented minorities at the undergraduate and graduate levels. However, to increase enrollment of these students it is necessary to have an educational pipeline that prepares highly qualified students to enter college. It is also important to offer robust programs to maintain STEM students through the undergraduate years and prepare them for advanced study or to enter the STEM workforce. This session will provide both strategies and funding opportunities to build and sustain a STEM pipeline from middle school through graduate studies.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify a variety of grant opportunities that support stem education at all levels.
  2. Describe and apply strategies to develop a comprehensive STEM education pipeline at their home institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marjorie Piechowski, PhD, Emerita Director of Research Support, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

LC6: GIFT or GRANT: Researchers, Sponsored Programs and Development Working Together in Harmony
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Basic

Research Administrators and Development Officers not only have their own understanding of "What is a gift?" and "What is a grant?" but their respective offices have different missions and goals, and they each bring unique strengths and perspectives to the table. Add to this mix the researcher who just wants to secure funding for his/her project and the gift vs. grant problem can create real conflict and dysfunction within an institution. This session will explore the long-standing struggle between Gifts and Grants and the offices that administer them. We will discuss the problems and challenges, and offer strategies for working together in peace and harmony. The presenter will share the successful and mutually beneficial working relationship that she has developed with her counterpart in Development. Participants will be encouraged to share the experiences they have had at their institutions, as well as any successes and/or failures for navigating the gift vs. grant situation.

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the key differences between a gift and a grant.
  2. Recognize the strengths and perspectives held by researchers, sponsored programs and development officers on the topic of gifts vs. grants; implement strategies at their institution for developing a mutually beneficial working relationship with their counterparts in Development.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Anne Schauer,  MA, CRA, Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, Miami University

M302: Pre-award Preparation for Post-award Success
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Basic

Winning a grant award requires preparation at many levels, as does the administration of an award. In this session attendees will learn how to guide the investigator through the in-depth planning required for a successful series of proposals. This includes both scientific and practical preparation such as researching sponsor priorities. On the organization level, preparation and management involves a wide range of compliance issues. Attendees will leave the session with resources for planning and managing proposals and awards. This session will be most useful for newcomers to research administration and administrators at smaller institutions.

Certificate: PA-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Knowledge of the many levels of investigator and institutional compliance.
  2. A framework for guiding investigators to successful proposal activities.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Renee Vaughan,  MDiv, MA, CRA, Financial Practice Manager, Duke University SoM, Camie Morrison, MBA, CRA, CAP,  Director OSR, Rutgers and Monique Gregory, MRA, Research Administrator, Treasurer Southern Sectio, University of Central Florida, College of Health & Public Affairs

M402: Town Hall Meeting – Working with Foundations
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

This is a presentation will be formatted at an open discussion between the presenters and participates. We ask that participant join us in a lively discussions in which many topics will be covered - highlight the importance of reading and understanding the Private and Foundation funding announcements, the eligibility requirements, the development of a budgets, and the review of contracts should the proposal be funded. In addition, we will discuss questions and topics that participates provide and share best practices or ideas that are currently being used by the group. Staff members from the Bill & Melinda Gates & The Henry M. Jackson Foundations will be prepared to answer any questions.

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand how to develop collaborative partnerships with non-profit sectors.
  2. Understand the importance of budinging strategies in developing public-private partnerships.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Cherri Helms,  MS, Grants and Contracts Manager, Jhpiego; Raminta Hanzelka, Senior Program Coordinator, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Qi Yang, MBA, CRA, Senior Grants Manager and Jennifer Jackson, CRA, Grants Manager, Office of Sponsored Programs, The Henry M. Jackson for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Inc.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

R1: A Day in the Life of a Sponsored Projects Officers (SPO) and Department Research Administrator
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 8:30am to 9:00am

Content level: Basic

Sponsored Projects Officers (SPO) and Departmental Research Administrators (DRA) face diverse challenges in proposal submissions. Both are integral to the submission process. Working together for a smooth proposal submission requires that the SPO and DRA work together. This requires effective communication, process improvement discussions, and a universal understanding of each person’s role in the proposal submission. Together, we will discuss and identify challenges facing the SPO and DRA in proposal submissions. In addition, we will offer ways to overcome these challenges and offer best practices in working together to facilitate research and smooth proposal submissions.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify ways Sponsored Projects Offices and Departments can work together in facilitating smooth proposal submissions; supporting researchers; and ensuring compliance.
  2. Identify best practices between Departments and Sponsored Projects Offices.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kathy Winkley, BA, Grants/Contracts Officer and Jan Abramson, MS, Sponsored Projects Officer, University of Utah

R4: Letters of Intent, White Papers, Preproposals, Logic Models, Abstracts, and Quad Charts
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 8:30am to 9:00am

Content level: Intermediate

Most grant agencies are beginning to require short preliminary papers before a full proposal can be submitted. These short documents serve multiple purposes in funding agencies but sometimes provide little detail on how to prepare them. This session will provide definitions of these short papers, their multiple purposes, and which funding agencies require them. The speaker will offer effective strategies to increase chances of funding success with well-developed short papers that meet agency needs. Agency-specific formats will be illustrated and a template will be provided for agencies that do not offer specific instructions. The session will be useful for research administrators fro all types of organizations.

Learning objectives:

  1. List many of the U.S. funding agencies that require these short papers and the multiple purposes they serve.
  2. Describe qualities of successful short papers and apply that knowledge of these qualities and strategies to help ensure a successful grant application.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marjorie Piechowski, PhD, Emerita Director of Research Support, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

R8: The Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) to Request for Proposal (RFP): A Model Parenting Technique to Shape up a Nascent Funding Resource
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 8:30am to 9:00am

Content level: Intermediate

The Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) is a ""competitive solicitation procedure"" of the Federal Government agencies to obtain scientific proposals (ideas, concepts, etc.) from various organizations for the advancement and acquisition of basic, applied, and some very early stage development research. BAAs are broad in their subject matter and used by agencies to fulfill their requirements for scientific study (or providing services) towards advancing the state-of-the-art or enhancing knowledge rather than focusing on a ""practical application of knowledge"" by acquiring specific systems, hardware procurement, or services, which are generally addressed in Request for Proposal (RFP).
BAAs are conceived as a very early stage (parental) funding resource solely created to increase the knowledge and understanding of certain ""broadly defined areas of interest"" of the Government. Therefore, in contrast to RFPs, any number of proposals, starting from all to none of the offerors, satisfying the requirements of the Government, may be accepted for award and could be accommodated within the overall available funding budget of a particular BAA.
A typical long range BAA has the following life cycle, which may start with the submission request for a ""concept/idea,"" an ""expression of interest,"" or a ""white paper"" (pre-proposal) addressing a particular problem and developing ideas for its solution. After review, only selected pre-proposals are invited for a final proposal submission. Once the selected groups start developing the proposal, it can potentially steer up the direction of government funding towards certain specific fields, services or study techniques for future and quite often it eventually results into a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) or RFP.
In this session, we will address the different models of BAA, its detail description and purpose in general, and its important role in generating FOAs, RFPs etc. Additionally we will also discuss why participation in the BAAs is quite important for a research organization.""

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the concept of BAA, and how they differ from RFA, RFP and FOA.
  2. The BAA response process and how this mechanism can increase the funding portfolio.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Dhanonjoy C  Saha, PhD, Director, Office of Grant Support, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Mindy Solivan, Assistant Director, University of Central Florida, Office of Research & Commercialization

R9: Tipping the Scales: A Case Study for Teaching Faculty Grant Writing
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 8:30am to 9:00am

Content level: Intermediate

When faculty need grant writing instruction, they are often caught in limbo between research administrators, whose role usually does not include grant writing instruction, and centralized research offices, where tailored support can be inaccessible and in-person grant writing workshops are offered infrequently. Even when workshops deliver high-quality instructional content, the traditional all-day format of these workshops all too often fly in the face of adult learning best practices - a huge misstep since this type of training is intended for faculty, a highly educated and sophisticated audience who have very limited time. During this case study, presenters will share how Arizona State University (ASU) is implementing a blended learning strategy that provides researchers with online instructions that can be accessed on-demand, which complement traditional in-person instructional workshops.

Learning objectives:

  1. List 4 key attributes of a successful faculty training program.
  2. Identify program elements that could be implemented in their own institutions with minimal effort.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Beth Moser, ABD, Instructional Design Specialist and Drew Brown, PhD, Associate Director OKED Training, Arizona State University

LC10: Motivating Reluctant, Inactive or Inexperienced Investigators to Pursue Grants
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 9:15am to 10:30am

Content level: Intermediate

In recent years competition for grants has intensified for many reasons, causing investigators at all career levels to become reluctant, discouraged or inactive in seeking support for their research. New investigators face their own challenges in getting that first award.  This session will offer an overview of characteristics of reluctant, inactive, inexperienced or discouraged researchers that deter them from pursuing grant funding. Based on a literature review and best practices, an array of strategies and solutions will be offered, including incentives, mentoring, partnering, targeted workshops, and individual strategic plans for research funding. Participants are encouraged to share examples and case studies of their own best practices for motivating and working with these investigators. The session will be interactive and participatory for research administrators from all types of institutions.

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe characteristics of inactive researchers at all career levels.
  2. List an array of strategies to encourage grant participation from investigators at all academic and career levels.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marjorie Piechowski, PhD, Emerita Director of Research Support, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

T202: Grant Development for Graduate Students: Departmental, College and University-level Training Methods
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

How can we train graduate students when there is so much else to do in an [insert name of office here? This presentation will pose the opposite question – how can you not? Based on training conducted within a school of social science and in partnership with multiple central units of a research university, this session will cover four topics: why? The presenter will discuss how graduate training enhances institutional efficiency and success; how? Numerous training methods will be introduced; what? Four categories of training topics will be discussed, including how to blend and tailor topics fit different situations; and who: Potential audiences and partners will be addressed, focusing on opportunities for interdisciplinary, intra-institutional training. This session will contribute new insights regarding the importance of fostering grant training for graduate students, as an often overlooked yet inexpensive method for contributing to the overall success of research institutions.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify methods and topics for training graduate students in grant development for sponsored projects.
  2. Brainstorm potential training partners for graduate-level grant instruction across their institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Christina Leigh Deitz, MLS, DPS-IM, Grant Development Administrator, Syracuse University Maxwell School

T402: Embedded, Just-in-time Training in Research Administration Systems
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Basic

Arizona State University (ASU) recently deployed a new electronic research administration system with an aggressive schedule. Electronic research administration systems help the research administrator submit and track proposals more efficiently. Yet, delivering training on electronic research administration systems is tricky. Training workshops can provide an overview of new software, but are problematic as they are not only time-intensive but also require learners to apply what they learned at a later time on their own. Meanwhile, traditional online help or software documentation is ineffective in helping users learn and troubleshoot new technology. At ASU, we tackled this problem by developing and delivering “embedded instruction,” online training that is embedded within our electronic research administration system. This approach provides seamless instruction and help to the user at the exact moment that training is needed, or “just in time.” Using a case study of how we delivered training at ASU, presenters will share strategies and best practices for delivering technology training to research administrators.

Certificate: PA-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Cite 3 characteristics of effective training on electronic research administration.
  2. Identify the advantages of “just in time” assistance vs. traditional training.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Drew Brown, PhD, Associate Director and Beth Moser, Instructional Design Specialist, Arizona State Unviersity

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

W102: You Want to Do What? Investigator-initiated Clinical Research
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Advanced

We all have those investigators that are inspired, sometimes in the middle of night, to do amazing research projects. They are ambitious. They will add to the knowledge to possibly change practice. The investigators usually want to get it done yesterday. We want to help them. What are the steps we need to take to be sure that the investigators can carry out the study while protecting the participants and the institution? This session will cover the areas that need to be considered when an investigator enters into a clinical research study that he/she sponsors.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify investigator responsibilities in clinical research.
  2. Outline ways to manage the oversight institutions inherit when managing investigator-initiated clinical trials.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tonya Edvalson, CCRP, Regulatory Coordinator II, Intermountain Healthcare

W202: Anatomy and Physiology of Sponsored Awards
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Basic

This session will cover the components of grants and contracts, distinguish between gifts and awards, reveal various funding sources and explain the implications of "strings attached or unattached." Introduction to Research Administration and Management (IRAM) Certificate Session.

Certificate: IRAM-R, Category: II.Legal Issues in Research Administration

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to determine if funding is a gift or a grant.
  2. Participants will be able to identify various parts of a grant or contract.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Nancy Cruikshank, CRA Director of Grants, Research and Sponsored Programs, Slippery Rock University and Yvonne Brewster, Manager, Research Administration and Finance Departments of Anesthesiology and Surgery, University of Pittsburgh