Sponsored Programs Planning, Development and Deliveries (SP)

This track relates to the development and delivery of sponsored programs. Topics may include: how to develop collaborative partnerships with industry, government and non-profit sectors; identifying strategies in developing public-private partnerships; institutional capacity building, including supply-side partnerships; faculty, positioning; effective grant writing techniques; the role of the research administrator in sponsored programs development; diversifying funding sources;  communication strategies in sponsored programs development; and organizational and team structures to support successful program development.

Sunday, February 28, 2016

WS2: Pre-award Basics
Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 9:00am to 12:30pm

Content level: Basic

Pre-award research administrators who wish to help new investigators learn how to apply for grant funding and more experienced investigators hone their proposal-writing skills, must be able to help investigators understand how to read and interpret proposal guidelines; plan the proposal, understand what proposal parts or sections are expected, and employ effective writing strategies. While budget preparation must be considered as part of proposal development, this workshop will focus on other sections of the proposal: the abstract, problem/need statement, goals and objectives, methodology, and evaluation/dissemination. It will also include a discussion of the proposal-writing conventions that successful writers use, the importance of using graphics (timelines, charts and tables) to explain complicated ideas and save space, and the need for a strong budget justification.

This interactive workshop will provide an overview of the proposal development process and the techniques that lead to success. It is intended for pre-award research administrators, staff who are new to proposal development offices, or post-award staff who wish to gain an understanding of the proposal development process.

Learning objectives:

  1. Become familiar with types of proposals and understand effective writing strategies.
  2. Interpret and address proposal guidelines and write to review criteria.
  3. Learn how to manage the proposal development process.
  4. Know how to read and address review comments and when and how to resubmit.

 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Lesley Brown, MA, CRA, Director of Proposal Development, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

WS7: Proposal Budget Development: Building a Basic Grant Budget
Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 1:30pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

This workshop walks participants through proposal budget development. It will address concepts of what makes a "good" budget as well as afford practical advice for identifying budget components and how to assemble them.

Learning objectives:

  1. Build a proposal budget and justification (both basic and advanced topics included).
  2. Identify applicable federal regulations such as Uniform Guidance, etc. and understand how these regulations impact the formation of proposal budgets.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Erin Bhagvat, MBA, Research Administrator; Matthew Anderson, Director of Research, Morsani College of Medicine; and Victoria Mothershed, Research Administrator, University of South Florida

Monday, February 29, 2016

M102: Post-Submission to Award Acceptance
Monday, February 29, 2016 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Basic

The pre-award office is responsible for dealing with a variety of issues that arise after proposal submission and lead to acceptance of the award. The pre-award administrator should be able to deal with publication restrictions, intellectual property, indemnification, facilities and administrative costs questions and know how to address such special situations as international agreements and just in time (JIT) requirements. The session will identify troublesome clauses and discuss how to determine what to accept and what to reject, and other difficult contract review topics. This session will also include the perspective of a sponsor’s grants management office.

Learning objectives:

  1. Review different types of award terms and conditions, including Federal Acquisition Regulations and different grants policy manuals. 
  2. Negotiate acceptance of awards.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Camie Morrison, CRA, Director of Sponsored Research, Rutgers University - Camden Campus; Katie Joffee, Grants Management Specialist, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS), United States

M202: Planning for the Unexpected/Transition - Develop/Use Standard Operating Procedures
Monday, February 29, 2016 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Intermediate

Your Institution lost an employee to attrition -How well prepared is your organization to sustain research administration? Research Administrators (RA) are a limited resource; you recruit a replacement. What resources will they have to know how research administration is performed at your institution? Development and use of standard operating procedures (SOPs) defines institutional RA duties and provides a road map for accomplishing them accurately and in a timely fashion. How many times have you heard 'no one told me that' or 'I wasn’t trained to do it that way?' Well written SOPs allow research infrastructure to operate in a continuum, independent of who is in the office and who trains the new person. This session will give practical advice on SOP development: which ones you need, who should develop and write the SOPs and how and when they need to be maintained. Learn from an experienced team how to guide your employees to succeed!

Learning objectives:

  1. Be able to analyze their internal procedures, organize them into practical standard operating procedures and routinely assess their effectiveness. 
  2. Be able to use a modified Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (S.W.O.T.) matrix to identify the Standards and Procedures (SOPs) that need to be written, who should write them and order of importance.

 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Sandra Mancuso, MA, Director, Grants & Sponsored Programs, Barry University; Kate McCormick, CRA, Research Administrator

 
 

M302: Faculty Transfers: Hello and Goodbye
Monday, February 29, 2016 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Intermediate

Faculty come into our university and leave our university very regularly. This presentation will focus on the many responsibilities and duties that face the Department Administrator to achieve a successful faculty transfer. The session will provide a checklist of specific duties and "best practices" that must be accomplished to ensure a seamless transition. The presentation will also provide actual case studies and real-life scenarios so that the participants and presenters can dialogue on these "what would you do now" or "how would you handle this" cases/situations.

Learning objectives:

  1. Better understand what is needed from them and what he/she needs to do when faculty are transferring into their university. 
  2. Learn what to do when their faculty are leaving their university or transferring within their university to another department or school.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

William Hoffman, MAS, Department Administrator, Dental School; Karen Sack, BS, Administrator, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, School of Medicine; and Janet Simons, Director of Research Policy, Office of the Vice President, University of Maryland, Baltimore

 

M402: Sub-contracting? Answers to Commonly Asked Questions at the Proposal Stage
Monday, February 29, 2016 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

Sub-awards are normally included in a proposal when the submitting institution cannot complete part of the project. When preparing their proposal, a principal investigator (PI) may ask some of the common questions concerning sub-awards, which include: What is a sub-award and when do I need one? Why is it important for me to know the difference between a sub-award, a consultant agreement and a vendor quote before submitting my proposal? Where do I include the sub-award in the budget? What is generally required when including a sub-award in my proposal? Why do we budget our institution's indirect costs on the sub-award's indirect? When can the sub-award include indirect costs in their budget? What happens when my proposal is funded?

Learning objectives:

  1. Explain the complexity involved when a proposal includes a sub-award. 
  2. Understand the difference between a sub-award, a consultant agreement and a vendor quote at the proposal stage.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Craig O'Neill, CRA, Manager, Office of Sponsored Programs, Michigan State University

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

T102: The Research and Development (R&D) Funding Horizon: A How-to Guide for New Researchers
Tuesday, March 1, 2016 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Basic

The 2015 federal budget embodies a commitment to increase investments in science and technology. To achieve this goal, the Budget calls for targeted investments in science, technology and innovation. University federally funded scientific discovery and technological breakthroughs are the primary engines from which the country is expanding the frontiers of human knowledge, responding to the call for innovation and is addressing the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century. Part I gives an overview of the federal research and development (R&D) funding landscape. Part II is s step-by-step guide on where to find funding opportunities and how to tailor searches to faculty research interests. Discuss calculated capture planning to allow for increased time to; evaluate, prepare for and respond to upcoming funding opportunities. Part III will give an overview of federal acquisition regulations.

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand 2015/2016 budget funding trends and identify funding opportunity sources & utilization of search mechanisms. 
  2. Understand capture planning tools and capture planning best practices; and understand Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation (DFAR).

 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Courtney Boyce, MS, Contracts, Communications & Training Officer and Jessica Atlass Roscoe, Proposal Development Manager, Georgetown University

T202: Groupthink: Working Collectively to Achieve Pre- and Post-award Goals
Tuesday, March 1, 2016 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Basic

Institutions vary in size, grant activity, resources and needs. It is essential for mid-level research administrators to work together as a group, share ideas, tips, advice, lessons learned and leverage resources and knowledge on pre- and post-award issues. The City University of New York (CUNY) is a large university system that consists of 24 colleges. The CUNY Mid-Level Exchange was established in 2013 and meets bi-monthly to discuss topics such as complying with responsible conduct research (RCR)/conflict of interest (COI) requirements, legal contracts, grant personnel, cost sharing and effort reporting, funding opportunities and professional development. In this session, attendees will be given an overview of this highly successful initiative and learn how they can implement it in their institutions at the school, departmental, institute or institutional level.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify ways you can leverage your resources and knowledge.
  2. Identify and differentiate what topics/ideas are appropriate for this approach.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Carolynn Julien, MS, Associate Director, Hunter College, City University of New York (CUNY)

T302: Crowdfunding 101 for Research Administrators
Tuesday, March 1, 2016 - 1:45pm to 3:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

While many institutions have determined that crowd funding should be treated as a donation, sponsored projects offices keep getting pulled back into the fray. With decreasing funding rates and greater competition for federal funding, principal investigators are eager to explore crowd funding as an alternative funding venue with seemingly fewer strings attached. Sites such as Kickstarter, Experiment.com and Benefunder are just a few of the names that may have popped up on your radar. Will or does your institution allow the initial fees for setup of the websites to be charged to sponsored projects? Is your institution entering into exclusive agreements with one crowd funding site or perhaps creating your own crowd funding site? Are you allowing faculty to sign these agreements without institutional involvement? The lists of questions that will be explored are numerous.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify policies and procedures that should be in place for accepting and managing these funds. 
  2. Understand that "one-size" may not fit all as crowd funding purveyors differ.

 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Susan Sedwick, PhD, CRA, CSM, Consultant, Attain, LLC

 
 

T402: With Departmental Administrators; Without Departmental Administrators. How do you Survive?
Tuesday, March 1, 2016 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Intermediate

Institutions vary in size, grant activity, resources and needs. It is essential for mid-level research administrators to work together as a group, share ideas, tips, advice, lessons learned and leverage resources and knowledge on pre- and post-award issues. The City University of New York (CUNY) is a large university system that consists of 24 colleges. The CUNY Mid-Level Exchange was established in 2013 and meets bi-monthly to discuss topics such as complying with responsible conduct research (RCR)/conflict of interest (COI) requirements, legal contracts, grant personnel, cost sharing and effort reporting, funding opportunities and professional development. In this session, attendees will be given an overview of this highly successful initiative and learn how they can implement it in their institutions at the school, departmental, institute or institutional lDepartmental administrator, what’s that? In the PUI world departmental administrators are a luxury and often the sponsored projects office acts as the departmental administrator to get the application submitted timely and closed out properly. How does this dual role impact Sponsored Projects Office (SPO) and what can you do? This session will explore options to facilitate pre and post award functions in the PUI environment of “doing more with less.” Are there useful tools to determine how offices should be structured? This session will also explore the pros and cons of having departmental administrators working with a central research administration office. Central Administration: Pre- and Post-award together or apart; what are the strengths and weaknesses? Perspectives will include pre -, post- award and departmental administrators.

Learning objectives:

  1. Strategies to get buy-in from departmental assistants and promote involvement with the SPO. How to develop an infrastructure in a PUI that facilitates pre and post processes.
  2. To discuss the pros and cons of having pre- and post-award under the same roof. Identify strategies to evaluate effectiveness. Useful tools to assist in structuring an office.

 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Beverly Morehouse, MBA, Grants & Contracts Specialist, Sephen F. Austin State University; Joyce Donnelly, Administrator and Karen D. Mitchell, MBA, Senior Director, Grants Management, Temple University

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

W102: Electronic Research Administration (eRA) Overview/Submission Technologies
Wednesday, March 2, 2016 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Basic

This session offers some explanation and discussion on what electronic research administration (eRA) is and a historical overview of eRA. Features to consider when establishing the eRA framework of an organization are reviewed and system-to-system interfaces will be touched on. Funding development tools such as Research.gov, Grants.gov, Foundationcenter.org, etc. that assist in locating and submitting to funding will be discussed. Common electronic submission systems such as Grants.gov and National Science Foundation (NSF) Fastlane will be overviewed including strategies and tips for successful submissions.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify key features of common electronic proposal submission systems relevant to pre-award processes. 
  2. Understand general expectations of major federal electronic submission programs such as Grants.gov and NSF Fastlane.

 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Fran Stephens, CRA, Proposal Development Specialist, University of Oklahoma

 

W202: Contract Drafting and Negotiation
Wednesday, March 2, 2016 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Basic

This session will provide an in-depth examination of drafting and negotiating research agreements. Topics will include contract anatomy, standard clauses and troublesome language. We will discuss sponsor needs versus university requirements and communication techniques to find common ground. Case study examples and agreement templates will be used to illustrate and discuss best practices and common pitfalls.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the anatomy of a contract and understand common legal terms. 
  2. Develop effective communication strategies to negotiate troublesome clauses.

 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Donna R Kiley, CRA, Associate Director, Grants & Contracts Administration, Research Foundation, State University of New York; Justine Gordon, Director, Grants and Contracts Administration