Sponsored Programs Planning, Development and Deliveries (SP)

This track relates to the development and delivery of sponsored programs. Topics may include: how to develop collaborative partnerships with industry, government and non-profit sectors; identifying strategies in developing public-private partnerships; institutional capacity building, including supply-side partnerships; faculty, positioning; effective grant writing techniques; the role of the research administrator in sponsored programs development; diversifying funding sources;  communication strategies in sponsored programs development; and organizational and team structures to support successful program development.

Sunday, May 7, 2017

WS2: Proposal Budget Development: Building a Basic Grant Budget
Sunday, May 7, 2017 - 9:00am to 12:30pm

Content level: Basic

Are you new to pre-award or do you feel overwhelmed when a Principal Investigator (PI) contacts you for help developing a budget? Then let us help you not only understand the fundamentals of creating an effective budget for both federal and private grants, but also give you tips and tricks for creating time-saving templates. We will discuss effort and the considerations needed to account for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) salary cap, the benefits of a detailed travel budget, and calculating the correct Facilities and Administration (F&A) base. Additionally, translating the budget to the budget justification will be discussed.

Certificate: PA-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Outline the major factors in an effective budget.
  2. Provide detail on the budget components most heavily reviewed by sponsors.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Erin Bhagvat, Research Administrator, University of South Florida and Dan Wojcik, Senior Research Administrator, University of Florida

WS8: Proposal Development: Pre-award Overview
Sunday, May 7, 2017 - 1:30pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

Pre-award research administrators are often called upon to provide training and to assist investigators with all aspects of proposal preparation and, therefore, need to have a basic knowledge of all the steps in the process. This workshop will cover the different types of proposals; how to read and interpret proposal guidelines; sections of the proposal: summary/abstract, problem/need statement, goals & objectives, methodology, evaluation, personnel, institutional resources, and timeline; and the importance of organization and presentation. While budget development is a key component of proposal preparation, that topic is the focus of a separate ½ day workshop so will not be covered in this session. I always strive to make my presentations as interactive as possible, so the session will incorporate hands-on individual and small group activities, and will encourage all participants to contribute their experiences and ask questions throughout. The intended audience is new pre-award research administrators who wish to gain a thorough understanding of the proposal development process.

Certificate: PA-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the types of proposals, interpret and address proposal guidelines and understand their impact on proposal organization.
  2. List and describe the parts of a typical proposal and understand how their organization and placement affects the review process.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Anne Schauer, M.A., CRA, Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, Miami University and Tabatha Lemke,  Grant Manager, Research Sanford Health

Monday, May 8, 2017

M102: Swimming with the Big Fish: Mid-Size Institutions Coordinating Large, Multi-Institutional Federal Grants
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Intermediate

Central Michigan University (CMU), though a mid-size, Midwestern university, has resources and expertise that are nationally prominent in several important areas of study. CMU has bolstered its strongest programs by hiring cohorts of faculty with complimentary expertise. Often these cohorts and their staff will work collaboratively on sponsored projects, which in turn, include subcontracts with other national experts. The largest of these sponsored projects can become cumbersome to budget and document, involving the coordination of many other university offices of research, departmental administrators, and subrecipient project leaders. Racing to meet deadlines with all of these stakeholders in tow can be an antacid-requiring process, especially with a strong-minded Principal Investigator (PI) at the helm.

During this discussion-based presentation, we will provide details of a large, collaborative, federal award that included a few hiccups along the way. The presenters will share lessons learned from both the pre-award and post-award perspective, before transitioning to group discussion about opportunities and potential pitfalls of multi-institutional project agreements. Presenters will provide participants with case studies and real-world scenarios that involve multiple types of collaborators and partners (businesses, universities, government agencies). Key topics include – best practices for collaborative submissions, essential subaward documentation, and how Uniform Guidance dictates the decision-making process.

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will identify the documentation commonly needed for successful collaboration on federal grants and contracts.
  2. Participants will describe and discuss best practice strategies and characterize issues of potential concern when working with multiple entities on a federal grant.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Melinda Brakenberry, MPA, CFRA, Manager, Post Award Sponsored Projects and Deborah Clark, BS, MS, Research Officer, Central Michigan University

M202: Research Administrator’s Forum Eliminates Barriers and Builds Institutional Capacity
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Intermediate

Are you ready to forever change the culture and communication between the central sponsored programs and the departmental/college research administrator’s offices? If so, then this is the session for you. Join us as we share a proven methodology that has worked at three educational institutions. We are all faced with daily challenges to meet deadlines and assist faculty with proposal submissions. The central sponsored programs offices and the department/college units have similar challenges. However, we often have competing priorities, and different roles and responsibilities. Frequently, these offices do not see eye-to-eye and this can contribute to research administration dysfunction. In this session, we will discuss a proven format that bridges the communication gap and competing priorities while ensuring that we all stay connected working towards one common goal. The best part is that we accomplish the goal of building research administration capacity and we have FUN in the process!

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn how a Research Administrator’s Forum Facilitates Communications.
  2. Build institutional capacity through these increased networks and knowledge base.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Lynn Asseff, CRA, Director of Operations, College of Engineering & Computer Science; Miriam Campo, Director, Sponsored Programs, Florida Atlantic University; Amber Hardie, CRA, Grants and Contracts Manager, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville and Beth Eslick, Assistant Director, Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida

M302: Doing More with Less
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Intermediate

Departmental administrator, what’s that? In the Predominantly Undergraduate Institution (PUI) world departmental administrators are a luxury and often the sponsored projects office acts as the departmental administrator to get the application submitted timely and closed out properly. How does this dual role impact Sponsored Projects Office (SPO) and what can you do? This session will explore options to facilitate pre and post award functions in the PUI environment of “doing more with less.” Are there useful tools to determine how offices should be structured? This session will also explore the pros and cons of having departmental administrators working with a central research administration office. Central Administration: Pre and Post Award together or apart; what are the strengths and weaknesses? Perspectives will include pre -, post- award and departmental administrators.

Learning objectives:

  1. Strategies to get buy-in from departmental assistants and promote involvement with the SPO; useful tools to assist in structuring an office.
  2. How to develop an infrastructure in a PUI that facilitates pre and post process and identify strategies to evaluate effectiveness.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Beverly Morehouse, MBA, Grant and Contract Specialist, Stephen F. Austin State University; Denise Burgan, Research Administrator, Office of Research & Scholarship University of South Florida, USF College of Arts & Sciences and Karen D. Mitchell, MBA, Senior Director, Temple University

M402: Building and Enhancing the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Pipeline
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

Much recent data on enrollment of U.S. citizens in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines shows a continuing need to enroll women and underrepresented minorities at the undergraduate and graduate levels. However, to increase enrollment of these students it is necessary to have an educational pipeline that prepares highly qualified students to enter college. It is also important to offer robust programs to maintain STEM students through the undergraduate degree and prepare them for further study or to enter the STEM workforce. This session will provide both strategies and funding opportunities to build and sustain a STEM pipeline from middle school through graduate studies.    

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify a variety of grant opportunities that support STEM education.
  2. Describe strategies to develop a strategic STEM education pipeline at their home institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marjorie Piechowski, PhD, Emerita Director of Research Support, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

M401: Pre-award Preparation for Post-award Success
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

Winning a grant award requires preparation at many levels, as does the administration of an award. In this session attendees will learn how to guide the investigator through the in-depth planning required for a successful series of proposals. This includes both scientific and practical preparation such as researching sponsor priorities. On the organization level, preparation and management involves a wide range of compliance issues. Attendees will leave the session with resources for planning and managing proposals and awards. This session will be most useful for newcomers to research administration and administrators at smaller institutions.

Learning objectives:

  1. Knowledge of the many levels of investigator and institutional compliance.
  2. A framework for guiding investigators to successful proposal activities.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kathryn Watkins, Med, Assistant Vice President, Research Admin, The University of Akron and Heather Kraus, Senior Manager for Research Administration, University of Michigan

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

R5: How a Research Nursing School Revised Its Culture of Research
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 8:30am to 9:00am

Content level: Intermediate

Discussion of how one school re-vitalized their culture of research and significantly increased awarded grants.
Share ideas on how your institution encourages and supports grant submissions.

Learning objectives:

  1. List activities taken to increase the submission of research grants.
  2. Identify the barriers to these activities and how an institution might overcome these barriers to succeed.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Margaret Roudebush, MNO, Assistant Dean of Research Administration, CWRU

R6: Organizational Resilience: How to Build and Sustain a Strong Office
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 8:30am to 9:00am

Content level: Advanced

Organizational Resilience is defined as “the ability of an organization to anticipate, prepare for, respond and adapt to incremental change and sudden disruptions in order to survive and prosper." In times of  unanticipated big changes such as a change in leadership or catastrophic events such as loss of accreditation, non-compliance or scandal, it may be all a leader can do to get the day to day work out the door. Preparing for the inevitable if not unexpected will help to sustain an organization even through the darkest of times.

Learning objectives:

  1. Develop strategic planning goals that provide for sustainability and gaps in staffing.
  2. Be better prepared to provide stability through otherwise troubling times.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Susan Sedwick, PhD, CRA, CSM, Consulting Associate, Attain LLC and Michele Vaughan, BS, CCRP, Director, Clinical Research Operations for Hem/Onc/BMT Director, NEXT Consortium

T102: Motivating Reluctant, Inactive or Inexperienced Investigators to Pursue Grants
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 9:15am to 10:30am

Content level: Intermediate

In recent years competition for grants has greatly intensified for many reasons, causing investigators at all career levels to become reluctant, discouraged or inactive in seeking support for their research. New investigators face their own challenges in getting that first award. This session will offer an overview of characteristics of reluctant, inactive, inexperienced or discouraged investigators that deter them from pursuing grant funding. Based on a literature review and best practices, an array of strategies and solutions will be offered, including incentives, mentoring, partnering, targeted workshops, and individual strategic plans for research funding. Participants will be encouraged to share examples and case studies of their own best practices for motivating and working with these investigators. The session will be interactive and participatory for research administrators (proposal developers) from all types of institutions.

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe characteristics of inactive researchers at all career levels.
  2. List an array of strategies to encourage grant participation from faculty members at all academic levels.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marjorie Piechowski, PhD, Emerita Director of Research Support, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

T202: Contracts 101
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

Content level: Basic

The landscape of sponsored projects is becoming increasingly complex, extremely competitive and difficult to maneuver. This session provides a high level, introductory overview into the world of contracts by comparing and contrasting the differences between a grant and a contract. The presentation details the differences between the two by breaking down the federal definitions and regulations. Participants will also gain an understanding of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) structure and basic contracting processes as well as the differences in compliance, budgeting and reporting. Attendees will also learn about the different types of contracts and the varying risks associated with contract terms and conditions.    

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify and understand the differences between a contract, grant and gift.  Become familiar with the bid solicitation process and to distinguish between a cost/technical proposal. 
  2. Understand the structure of the FAR and how/when it's used as well as identify and understand FAR clauses in RFP's and which impact post-award administration.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Heather Winters, BS, Director, OSP, University of Memphis and Angela Fair, Associate Director, Office of Sponsored Programs, University of Memphis - USA

T302: Post-Submission to Award Acceptance
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 1:45pm to 3:00pm

Content level: Basic

The pre-award office is responsible for dealing with a variety of issues that arise after proposal submission and lead to acceptance of the award. The pre-award administrator should be able to deal with publication restrictions, intellectual property, indemnification, facilities and administrative costs questions, and know how to address such special situations as international agreements and JIT requirements. The session will identify troublesome clauses and discuss how to determine what to accept and what to reject, and other difficult contract review topics.

Certificate: PA-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Review different types of award terms and conditions, including Federal Acquisition Regulations and different grants policy manuals.
  2. Negotiate acceptance of awards.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Beverly Maddox, Director of Reseach Administration, College of Health and Human Services, Kennesaw State University and Charna Howson, Director, Sponsored Programs, Appalachian State University

T402: Electronic Research Administration
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Intermediate

The presentation will look at how electronic Research Administration (eRA) has changed the practices and procedures at research institutions. It will detail what issues can arise from utilizing electronic systems and provide a discussion of best business practices in dealing with eRA issues.

Certificate: PA-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand what issues can arise from using eRA systems.
  2. Understand what can be done to mitigate eRA issues at their institutions.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Sean Scott, CRA, Assistant Director, University of Kentucky

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

W202: Funding Development
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Basic

The aim of this session is to demystify the identification of funding opportunities by providing tips and techniques as well as an overview of various types of electronic search directories, engines, services and databases. Key considerations such as application due date, funding limitation, eligibility and other restrictions will be covered. Additionally search strategies using a wide range of funding programs, sources and opportunities applicable to specialty are provided. Participants will also review email alert services and the use of social media, particularly twitter streams as an optimal tool in funding development and dissemination of funding trends and opportunities in a global context. Tracking funding trends utilizing agency funding databases, new award reporting and forecasting via research.gov, etc are also outlined. Other approaches to finding funding such as attending professional meetings to connect with program officers as well as interact with peers with similar interest will be discussed.

Certificate: PA-R

 

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify funding opportunities utilizing electronic, social media and interpersonal mechanisms.
  2. Examine best practices in communicating funding opportunities and programs of significance to investigators and interested parties.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Amy L. Deborde, Business Director, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center