Management and Operations (MO)

Focus is on: delivery of operational services and research and financial compliance programs; facilities management; research infrastructure such as capital programs and building and managing of science and technology parks; human resources and international personnel management; and supporting collaborations with international organizations.

Sunday, April 2, 2017

WS10: Subrecipient Monitoring: What Is It and When Is It Enough?
Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 1:30pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

The presenter will lay the foundation of what has become known as “subrecipient monitoring” from the days of the Circulars to today having more focus and attention placed on expectations for oversight and monitoring.

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the requirements, tools and methodologies associated with Subrecipient monitoring.
  2. Understand how to identify management and technical risk on subawards ; understand how to develop an effective monitoring plan.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

John Sites, CRA, Manager, Huron Consulting Group

Monday, April 3, 2017

M204: Can't Find Qualified Research Administrators? We Have the Answer: Make Your Own!
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Intermediate

Finding qualified research administrators is a constant struggle. We have revised our approach to identify candidates by aptitude and interest. Financial background is a plus, but isn't necessary. After all, we can build them! This session will discuss how we identify qualified candidates, hire them, and train them into high performing research administrators. Once hired, we build customized training plans based on the candidate's prior experience and pulling on our internal subject matter experts which creates a network of mentors and support for the new research administrator.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify qualified candidates and hire them.
  2. Train new candidates into high performing research administrators.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Gina Liebig, Assistant Director, Engineering Research Administration, School of Engineering and Sean Collins, Training & Reporting Specialist, Engineering Research Administration, School of Engineering, Stanford University

LC3: Working Remotely, Are You Telework Ready?
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Basic

During this session, we will describe what is institution telework ready, what is self telework ready, and list management strategies that can help achieving a successful telework environment, and leading a telework team. First, we will let audiences to participate in a short survey showing on the screen to demonstrate that telework is possible and suitable for Research Administrators. Second, we will describe a list of items that an institution needs to implement in order to be telework ready. Discussion items will include technology, management support, and policy. Third, we will describe a list of items that an individual needs to have/do in order to be telework ready. Discussion items will include individual characteristics, at home working environment and technology, and self preparation. Finally, we will list some management strategies that can help managers to manage telework employees and achieve a successful telework environment. We will share our experiences on being a telework team, and policies and rules we adopted in our institution and our team.  During the presentation, we will also welcome discussions or sharing experiences from audiences. 

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify if their institution or themselves are telework ready.
  2. Identify some of the technology tools and management strategies they can adopt to maximize the effectiveness of telework experience. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Qi Yang, MBA, CRA, Senior Grants Manager and Jennifer Jackson, CRA, Grants Manager, The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Adv. of Military Medicine, Inc.

LC5: Summer and High School Research Programs: The Essentials and Achievement at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC)
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Basic

Managing large, complex internship programs can be daunting when considering the various activities involved: creating application systems, reviewing applications, fielding inquiries, responding to referrals, managing students, ensuring regulatory compliance, creating mentor/mentee relationship, etc. This session will draw on the speaker's experience in managing summer student education programs at a cancer research center in New York City to highlight essentials of successful program management. Many of these management principles can be translated to year-round programs for all age groups/educational backgrounds, as well as funding source (philanthropic, foundation, or federal). The role of metrics in measuring impact and conveying information will also be discussed.

Learning objectives:

  1. Based on the examples learn how to manage your student programs from strategic planning to implementation.
  2. Acquire new strategies and tools for establishing metrics on internship programs.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Farzeen Aslam Correia, Program/Fund Associate, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

M304: Examining and Improving Pre-award Processes
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Intermediate

Research Administrators (RAs) at institutions of all sizes are tasked with providing excellent pre-award service in an ever-changing environment. While submitting the proposal is the ultimate goal at the pre-award stage, faculty need assistance with tasks such as finding funding, creating budgets, learning electronic systems and institutional and agency compliance. This interactive session will focus on processes and procedures for pre-award administrators at the departmental or institute level at larger institutions or central administrators at smaller institutions that will satisfy faculty, sponsor and institution requirements and ensure post-award success.

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe best practice techniques that can be implemented at the departmental or central level.
  2. Improve the pre- to post-award process to streamline award establishment and start-up.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jane Dumsha, PhD, Chief Research Operations Officer, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and Dominic Esposito, Director of Sponsored Programs and Research, Baruch College

M404: What Are They Thinking? Perspectives of Central vs. Departmental Research Offices
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

The presenters will discuss their experiences regarding the differences between department and central research administration. The session will cover each unit's concerns, regarding allowability, allocation, consistency, and compliance. Additionally, the session will highlight differences between major research institutions and lessor research institutions, including Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs).

Learning objectives:

  1. Differentiate the perspectives of central vs. departmental research administration.
  2. Integrate the "other's" rationales into your work processes.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kate McCormick, CRA, Senior Grant Administrator, Suffolk University; Rene Hearns, Center Manager/Study Coordinator/Budget Analyst, IIRECC, US Department of Veterans Affairs; Thomas Burns, JD, MBA, Director, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Alexander Galea, Assistant Administrator, Johns Hopkins University

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

T203: A Frank Discussion on Service Centers
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

Content level: Basic

Institutions usually establish a variety of service units to provide specific services to support their sponsored research, instruction and other activities. These service operations are referred to as service centers and are categorized as specialized service facilities or recharge centers. This session will describe the differences between the two types of service centers provide examples for each category and, review the federal regulations that affect service center operations. Our focus will include the federal government’s concerns related to service center operations. Development of both federal and non-federal billing rates, and institutional service center policies, procedures and practices will be discussed. Service center operations, funding, and benefits at a major research institution will also be explored in this session along with where to gather data and get a handle on what all of an institution’s service centers may encompass.

Certificate: FM-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Attendees will gain an understanding of the federal requirements regarding service centers and how service centers develop user fees, bill users and function at institutions of higher education.
  2. Attendees will gain an appreciation of the benefits, challenges, responsibilities and costs of creating and operating service centers at a major research institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Deston Halverson, Senior Manager, Higher Education and Academic Medical Centers, Attain, LLC and Sara Bible, Associate Vice Provost, Research Administration, Stanford University

T205: On the Same Page: Project Initiation Meetings
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

Content level: Basic

Does your institution provide limited administrative support to Principal Investigators (PI) and require them to have a more active role in project management? The Rochester Institute of Technology has instituted a Project Initiation Meeting (PIM) in order to ensure all parties start on the same page. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the terms and conditions; compliance and reporting requirements; roles and responsibilities (PI, Research Office, Accounting/Finance staff, etc.); University related policies, procedures and compliance issues; and changes to the project since submission (project dates, personnel, budgeted rates, etc.). PIM attendees receive a Terms and Conditions Summary document which summarizes a variety of information including applicable general and specific award conditions and important dates. PI signature is required to acknowledge their understanding and acceptance of the project requirements. This session will discuss the genesis of, continued evolution, usefulness, and importance of this university-wide tool in assisting with project management and compliance.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the benefits of conducting this type of meeting, determine content, identify key meeting participants for their institution.
  2. Assess applicability to their institution, determine considerations for development and implementation, and adoption as a best practice.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Nicholas Rogers, MBA, Senior Grants and Contracts Specialist, Rochester Institute of Technology

T304: Enhancing Your Research Administrative Model: The Art of Unleashing the Hidden Potential
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 1:45pm to 3:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

After identifying several academic department challenges including competing priorities, turnover, lack of training, HR issues, audit issues, and lack of development plans, Johns Hopkins University (JHU) leadership formed a research work group to address these concerns. With the large size of our decentralized institution, we developed four subcommittees to concentrate on each category- HR, training, metrics, and recruitment. The subcommittee with an immediate impact was the training committee with their formation of a Fundamentals of Sponsored Programs Boot Camp. We will discuss the development and lessons learned based on our experiences. Other initiatives included rolling out a centralized model built upon best practices identified through a method known as Lean Sigma.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identifying problems and driving improvements for common grant management issues.
  2. Standardizing research administration by successfully tapping and leveraging internal resources.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kevin Fogarty, Sr. Director of Finance, Johns Hopkins Universiy School of Medicine; Alexander Galea, Assistant Administrator; Laura Noffke, Research Resource Development Associate and Amanda Casper, Research Service Manager, Johns Hopkins University

T404: 1,000,001 University Rules to Follow; Tips for Managing Your Department's Grant
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Basic

This step-by-step 75-minute presentation will focus on how to successfully manage and maintain a grant and budget awarded to a university department while adhering to federal, state, and university policy and procedures. The American Sign Language and Interpreter Education department at Eastern Kentucky University has been awarded various grants over the past 20 plus years. Amy Milcznski, the interim Associate Chair, and Lorna Grubb, who has worked for the department as the Budget Specialist for the past 15 years, will share strategies and approaches to post-award grant management. This session will briefly discuss overarching Federal and State policies and procedures as outlined in the Office of Management and Budget Uniform Guidance. The primary focus of this presentation will outline daily procedures and processes that will aide participants in organizing and overseeing grant funds. Presenters will share practical strategies for implementing maintenance of thorough records to stay in compliance for clean audit trails. This session will also detail and present efficient and effective records management at a departmental level. Topics covered: records management, database usage, justification, expenditure tracking, and standard operating procedures for a budget office.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Integrate practical application of organizational techniques.
  2. Assess their institutional needs and develop budget formats to ensure clean audits.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Amy Milcznski, MA, Interim Associate Chair and Lorna Grubb, Budget Specialist, Eastern Kentucky University

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

LC12: The Pre-award to Post-award Connection
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Intermediate

Pre-award administrators are usually recognized by faculty for working tirelessly on a proposal, often at the very last minute, both when the grant is submitted and upon notification of award. Many post-award administrators see a challenging road ahead when an agency funds a project and are often in the unenviable position of citing policy that the Principal Investigator may not have known when submitting the proposal.  This learning café will bring together pre- and post-award administrators to discuss best practices that will effectively streamline the submission to award lifecycle and avoid setbacks such as delays in project start-up.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify potential delays in proposal startup.
  2. Propose solutions to ensure a smooth pre-award to post-award transition.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jane Dumsha, PhD, Chief Research Operations Officer, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and Dominic Esposito, Director of Sponsored Programs and Research, Baruch College

W104: Human Resources Management and Best Practices for the Department Administrator
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Intermediate

This session will cover all aspects of Human Resources Management for the Department Administrator. This session will explore all pre-employment processes and best practices for the Administrator to get highly qualified candidates into their workplace. This session will also cover various payroll and equity issues that the Department Administrator may encounter. This will be a very interactive session between the participants and presenter and use various "what is wrong with this case study scenarios" to get everyone discussing how Human Resources Management is practiced at various Universities/Institutes. The session will also cover hot topics such as grievance/conflict resolution, VISA/International worker issues, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), performance evaluations, mentoring, Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), on-boarding and supervision styles/issues.

Learning objectives:

  1. Use best practices and case studies to assist the Department Administrator become a more effective manager.
  2. Understand Human Resource Management issues more clearly and how these issues are resolved by various Universities/Institutes.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

William Hoffman, MAS, Department Administrator, UMB--Dental School and  Nancy Bowers, Director of Finance & Administration, Dean's Office University of Maryland Baltimore School of Pharmacy

W205: Building a Bridge: The Importance of Forming and Enhancing Relationships
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Basic

Institutions vary in size, grant activity, resources and needs. It is essential for research administrators to work collectively and “build the bridge” with the various bodies that support the research infrastructure, as we are all on the same team striving for a common goal. The City University of New York (CUNY) is a large university system that consists of 24 colleges. Research Administrators in these colleges must work with several entities to accomplish their goals. Oversight by the university, the colleges and a fiscal agent must be sustained. Efficiencies in research compliance requirements, legal requirements, grant personnel, cost sharing, effort reporting, limited submissions, obtaining funding sources and professional development are some matters that can be complicated. In this session, attendees will learn how these entities work collaboratively to get the job done. We will also share ideas, tips, advice and lessons learned on how to leverage resources and knowledge. 

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify and explore new strategies and ideas to ensure an efficient pre- and post-award process.
  2. Identify how to leverage resources and knowledge to build the bridge.  Learn effective techniques to form and enhance these relationships.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Carolynn Julien, Associate Director, Hunter College of CUNY and Melisa Mendez, Associate Director, Baruch College of CUNY

W204: Effective Leadership Skills for Research Administrators and Clinical Supervisors
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Intermediate

Today's leadership landscape is dynamic with an unpredictable plethora of regulations and budgetary restrictions. Research Administrators and Clinical Supervisors, namely those in administrative and management roles, need a wide range of operational, relational, and analytical skills to effectively carry out their responsibilities. This session will provide information on being an effective leader, doing their jobs well and identifying how leadership skills can directly affect the quality of the performance of staff.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Define the traits of effective leadership; How to approach leadership proactively.
  2. Describe methods of assessing various leadership styles; How to effectively apply leadership principles as a research administrator and/or clinical supervisor.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Timothy Schailey, MS, Director, Research Administration, Thomas Jefferson University, Erin Bailey, Chief Financial Officer CTSI, University at Buffalo and Sarah Danna, Staff Assistant, Family Medicine, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York