Professional Development (PD)

Hosts workshops and sessions geared towards: continuing education commitment; building on personal growth and development; leadership; quality of life development; self-assessment; supervisor/staff relations; industrial/workplace psychology; emerging role of research administrators within the culture of research.

Sunday, April 2, 2017

WS1: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Fundamentals
Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 9:00am to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

Provides an overview of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), peer review of grant applications,  determination of award levels, grants management review and negotiation of awards, notice of award and pre/post-award management.

Certificate: NIH-R

Learning objectives:

  1. Have a better understanding of the NIH, roles and responsibilities of NIH staff, award mechanisms and grant applications.
  2. Locate funding opportunities, what systems are used at NIH, and pre/post award administration and monitoring.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Theresa Jarosik, Supervisory Grants Management Officer, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and Debbie Pettitt, MBA, Chief Grants Management Officier, National Institutes of Health

WS2: How Can We Do Better: Ways to Improve Our Team and Services
Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 9:00am to 12:30pm

Content level: Intermediate

This workshop will provide various methods that will assist participants improve their customer service. It will provide a method of recognizing a person's behavior style and that style's attributes. Also, methods for problem solving.  These methods assist in team building to enable the team to provide better customer service. A customer is defined as anyone who has needs we fulfill. 

Learning objectives:

  1. Strengthen level of service we provide our customers.
  2. Create a more positive work environment.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kate McCormick,  CRA, Senior Grant Administrator, Suffolk University and Rene Hearns, Center Manager/Study Coordinator/Budget Analyst, IIRECC, US Department of Veterans Affairs

WS8: Leadership - Change Management - Overcoming Barriers to Implementation & Optimization
Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 1:30pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Advanced

If you're reading this workshop offering, you've no doubt taken your share of courses on teamwork and leadership, communication, conflict resolution. And yet, challenges and barriers remain and performance and change never seem to optimize and change. What sounds great in a seminar presents a daunting challenge to implement in the real world - silence or endless questioning that derails your objective. Why is that? Based on 30 years' experience working with diverse organizations, this workshop introduces you to a psychologist's methodologies: the skills (not theory and not just concepts) to bridge the knowing - implementation gap; operationalizing buy-in and collaboration; the role of language; achieving rapid results; activities-outcomes-results that move you and your group to break the gravitational pull of current thinking to break-through thinking and future state.

Learning objectives:

  1. Demonstrate the foundational skills of buy-in and collaboration: art and science of listening and questioning, languaging, identifying and overcoming layers of resistance.
  2. Demonstrate your operational plan to achieve Expected Results - the sufficiency test.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Stanley Sack, PhD, Organizational, Training & Strategy Consultant, Persona, Inc. and Dwayne Lehman, D.Sc., Business Manager, Carnegie Mellon University

Monday, April 3, 2017

M101: The Power of Habit
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Basic

How can some people transform nearly every aspect of their life, while others seem to have the same challenges that they did five, ten, or twenty years ago?  When you look at what made certain people successful you will start to find some common denominators. They were successful by zeroing in on patterns that shape every aspect of their life. They succeeded by transforming habits. In this presentation, we’ll explore how our ingrained habits run our lives and what we can do about it. We will also discuss why some people struggle to change, while change can seem to come quite easy to others. The key to having the success that we want in life, be it in losing weight, being a better parent, and becoming more productive is to understand just how habits work. Once we can harness the power of habit we can transform our lives, whether it’s at work or at home.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify what habits, subconscious or otherwise, are making them stuck.
  2. Have the tools and knowledge to replace those habits, allowing them to achieve the success they desire.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Scott Freedland, Account Executive, Evisions 

M201: National Science Foundation (NSF) Update
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Basic

This session will cover new developments at the National Science Foundation (NSF) - programs, policies, people and budgets. Senior NSF staff will provide a comprehensive review of what is new and developing at NSF.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn about the NSF Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 and 2017 budgets and administration priorities for NSF programs.
  2. Understand how NSF has implemented recent changes to proposal and award policies and procedures.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Samantha Hunter, Senior Policy Specialist, National Science Foundation

LC1: Mindfulness in Science and Research Administration
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Basic

Applying theories and practice based on the books Mindfulness in Organizations, The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success, and Emotional Intelligence 2.0.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify their strengths and weakness in the EI grid.
  2. Identify uses for mindfulness in their organization, department, or personal lives.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Andrea Nievera, MA, CRA, Senior Financial Analyst, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

M301: One Step at a Time: Working through Procrastination
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Basic

Are these familiar phrases: The project is due in a month.  I’ll get started next week. I need to get organized first. I work best under pressure. I need to get some other things done first, then I’ll get started. 95% of the population has deemed that they have a chronic or serious problem with procrastination. Procrastinators are often looked at as people who “bite” off more than they can chew, just can’t get themselves organized or know all the excuses for not starting their projects. As procrastinators on the job, people lose faith in the procrastinators, eventually don’t trust the procrastinator and most times the procrastinator is left behind and can’t advance. Collectively, we’ll explore: some of the reasons why procrastination takes over; consequences of letting procrastination take over and understand the power that procrastination has had over you.

Learning objectives:

  1. Start a process through which you can begin to overcome the procrastination in your life.
  2. Have a plan to be better equipped to live with your procrastination.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Paulette Jones, BS, Administrator University of Montana

M401: Applying a Project Management Perspective to the Administration of Research
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

Sponsored research can be defined in terms of a project with a defined scope, timeline, cost and other resources. Understanding the components and phases of designing, developing, executing, monitoring and closing a project using established project management principles can enhance the service research administrators provide to faculty members and other researchers.       

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the the principles of project management.
  2. Apply the principles of project management to the administration of sponsored research grants, contracts, and cooperatives.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Dwayne Lehman, D.Sc., Business Manager, Carnegie Mellon University

LC7: Who's Who and What They Do at the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Basic

With this presentation we hope to take away some of the mystery you encounter when contacting the National Institutes of Health (NIH) with questions about your grants. The NIH is composed of myriad offices, institutes and centers, each with its own specific responsibilities and functions. Finding the right NIH office or staff person to contact with your grant issue can sometimes be daunting to the uninitiated. When do you call the Electronic Research Administration (ERA) Helpdesk? What is Code of Federal Regulations (OFM)? Should I talk to the program Officer or the Grants Management Specialist? All will be revealed! At the conclusion of this presentation you will have a basic understanding of who does what at the NIH and how all these offices work together.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify major components of the NIH and locate the appropriate NIH office to address grant inquires.
  2. Locate grants policy resources and important staff contact information.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Debbie Pettitt, Senior Grants Management Specialist, National Institutes of Health

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

R5: Case Study of University of California (UC) Merced’s Centralized & Decentralized Research Development Support Units
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 8:30am to 9:00am

Content level: Basic

The purpose of this research is to present a case study from the newest University of California campus—Merced (UCM)—to discuss how pre-award research development foci and organization may impede or catalyze proposal development. Our research will provide a myriad of campus insight into the best ways to provide pre-award and research administration support, strategies on how to improve the existing infrastructure, and possible ways to prepare greater efficiency and effectiveness as our campus prepares for major changes as we move toward Project 2020, an initiative currently underway to almost double the campus in physical size and student and faculty numbers but not research support staff. Our overall goals of this presentation are two-fold. First, we will evaluate two external program evaluation reports from accredited research administration and development organizations and their recommendations from 2012. By evaluating their recommendations from 4 years ago, we are able to denote which recommendations were followed, which were not, and understand from colleagues at the director and administration-leadership levels why these recommendations were not implemented. Second, we will engage in qualitative interviews with faculty members who regularly seek proposal development assistance from all three schools (Natural Sciences, Engineering, and Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts) and each of the three organized research units (ORUs) (Health Science Research Institute, Sierra Nevada Research Institute, and Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society). In these interviews, we will allow faculty to discuss their views on UCM’s current research development services and how these may or may not flourish, as UCM will almost double in physical size and faculty by the year 2020, noting that the number of research support staff will be doubling in size. Methodologically speaking, we will be using a Constructivist Ground Theory Approach regarding the review of the two program evaluation reports. Allowing pre-award assistance themes to emerge allow for baseline guidance in understanding both positive and negative issues that were already present from the current hierarchical organization just 7 years after the university’s establishment in 2005. Our qualitative interviews will begin with a Convenience Sample of faculty that our units have regularly assisted in the past. Since individual rapport has already been established with these faculty members, trust and entrée into this population should not serve as a barrier. From there, we will utilize a Snowball Sampling Approach, gaining names of other faculty members to discuss their views on the current and future practices of a Centralized Radio Data System (RDS) and decentralized School and ORU unit approach.  Through our research, we will provide campus insight into the best ways to provide pre-award and research administration support, strategies on how to improve the existing menu of services of proposal development support, and possible ways to enact greater efficiency and effectiveness via discussion as our campus prepares for major changes as we move toward major growth with Project 2020.

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn best practices and barriers from a centralized unit and quasi-centralized unit in supporting faculty and leadership to obtain extramural funding and discuss strategies that currently work and do not work from a small but growing research university.
  2. Gain valuable and strategic research support insight using baseline data via reports from two research administration organizations and faculty/staff insight on current research support offices as our campus doubles in size/capacity by 2020.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Melinda Boehm, PhD, Research Development Officer, University of California Merced

R3: Discovering Who the Reader Is: Research Adminstrators as Proposal Reviewers
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 8:30am to 9:00am

Content level: Basic

Have you ever considered becoming a ‘reader’? This session will outline why and how a Research Administrator would become involved with an agency grant review process. Impressions of reviews for the U.S. Department of Education’s Strengthening Institutions (Title III), TRIO Upward Bound and the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) programs will be shared. Applications for proposal development training for faculty will also be featured.

Learning objectives:

  1. Gain deeper understanding for how reviews are handled.
  2. Learn steps for becoming a grant proposal reviewer.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Bonnie Troupe, Director of Academic Development, Stonehill College

T101: Blaze the Trails to Your Future Professional Development
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 9:15am to 10:30am

Content level: Basic

Leadership in the ever-changing field of research administration is essential to institutional, organizational and personal growth. Institutions need qualified individuals who are current with policies and procedures and can provide the best service to faculty. Professional organizations like Society of Research Administrators (SRA) International need trailblazers that can continue to grow the field and make SRA the industry leader in content delivery. Attendees will learn how contributing in these areas can help research administrators develop into nationally recognized innovators in the field.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Walk away with the ability to use those skills to strengthen and fortify institutional goals.
  2. Learn how to become more involved with SRA International so they will step into the organizational leadership with confidence and build their professional portfolio.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Dominic Esposito, CRA, Director of Sponsored Programs and Research, Baruch College; Ellen Zavala, Director of Research Services and Outreach, University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Rene Hearns, Center Manager/Study Coordinator/Budget Analyst, IIRECC US Department of Veterans Affairs

LC15: Networking for Professional Development
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 9:15am to 10:30am

Content level: Basic

Networks are groups of people with some common interest who share knowledge and assist each other in some way. Many of these networks are formed with little to no effort and some networks are already established, such as Society of Research Administrators (SRA) International. However active networking involves seeking out individuals and establishing mutually beneficial relationships with them.

Learning objectives:

  1. How to develop and build your own professional network.
  2. Why the first objective is important for your career and development goals.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kathy Harris, Director, Office of Sponsored Projects, March of Dimes Foundation

T201: Research Administrator as a Change Agent
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

Our institutions are constantly changing, whether due to external sources—such as sponsor rules and regulations—or internal factors—like senior leadership, faculty, and students needs and priorities. As research administrators, we pride ourselves on our adaptability and flexibility in the face of this near-constant change. But what if instead of managing this type of change, we led it?  Research administrators facilitate research, inspire, inform, and engage on a daily basis. With this skill set, and from our unique perspective in an institutional setting, we also make excellent change agents. In this session, we will discuss the merits of, and ways to become, a change agent at your institution. We’ll walk through a case study in which a research administration enterprise was completely reimagined from within. Then, using lessons learned from this process, we’ll discuss do-it-yourself tools for creating change in your own department, school or center, and institution.

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe why research administrators make excellent change agents, and in what areas our skill set best applies.
  2. Develop discreet strategies for management of external and internal change.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Zoya Davis-Hamilton, CRA, EDD, Director, Research Administration Initiatives and Sarah Marina, Assistant Director, Research Development and Research Administration, Tufts University

T204: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Update
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

Content level: Basic

Don’t miss this opportunity to hear about what is new and being developed within the National Institute of Health's (NIH) programs, policies, and budgets.  In this comprehensive review participants will learn about the newest policy updates and how their respective institutions may be impacted. Upon completion of the presentation, participants will have the opportunity to ask questions about new and existing policies and procedures.  Topics include recent and upcoming changes to NIH policy, compliance requirements, and so much more!

Certificate: IRAM-E

Certificate: NIH-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will learn about NIH's budget priorities.
  2. Participants will learn about new policies and compliance initiatives.
  3. Participants will gain insight into current issues at NIH.

Prerequisites: Participants should come with a basic knowledge of NIH.

Speaker(s):

Melinda Nelson, Acting Director, Division of Extramural Research Activities and Chief Grants Management Officer, NIAMS, NIH

T301: Engaging Challenging Staff: Techniques for the Emerging Leader
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 1:45pm to 3:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

Life is complex and employees are juggling work, family, and personal life. Frequently, personal issues and concerns negatively influence employee engagement and performance. How should leaders overseeing research administration offices engage employees while setting and meeting goals? This interactive session will explore the ways leadership styles and employee engagement interact. By incorporating best practices in human relations, emerging research administration leaders will be able to more adeptly inspire and create confident employees.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify ways to resolve inter-personal conflict, motivate, and build win-win relationships with employees.
  2. Identify ways to resolve inter-personal conflict, motivate, and build win-win relationships with employees.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kortnay Woods, PhD, Executive Director of Grants and Sponsored Research, The College of New Jersey

T401: Getting Your Principal Investigator to Yes: Negotiating Agreement for Organizational Transformation
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Basic

Many have come to the conclusion that it is difficult to get investigators to change. This can result in frustration when new processes and systems are being implemented to improve efficiencies and reduce institutional risks. In this session we will talk about what makes many investigators resistant to change and tactics that can be used to get their buy in when implementing new processes and/or systems at institutions.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe the obstacles that make investigators resistant to change.
  2. Identify the process of determining stakeholders' value and using it to "negotiate" positive changes to processes.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kevin Ferrell, CRA, Solutions Consultant, Evisions and Anne Schauer, Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, Miami University

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

W101: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Research Training Awards (K Awards) and National Research Service Awards (NRSA)
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Basic

Academic and research institutions thrive on the contributions of the young and new investigators that create the foundations of the future generations of successful academics and scientists. In order to encourage the new talented pool of scientists, NIH has designed the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (NRSA) and the Research Career Development Awards or K awards. The purpose of these grants is to create a new generation of young scientists, and to help the promising new or junior investigators to provide research support with specialized training, mentoring, protected time and resources to achieve research independence at the end of the award duration.

In this session we will review and discuss the eligibility, requirements, and various approaches and strategies to be successful to receive these awards, guidelines and tips about how to design the NRSA and K grant applications and pitfalls to avoid. In addition, we will discuss how to find these opportunities, build teams, develop budgets, and prepare competitive future proposals to become successful, independent scientists.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Certificate: NIH-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the types of NRSA and K-grant support and their requirements.                                                                  
  2. Better provide guidance to staff and potential recipients of NRSA and K-awards.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Debbie Pettitt, Senior Grants Management Specialist, National Institutes of Health and Dhanonjoy C  Saha, PhD, Director, Office of Grant Support

LC14: Anatomy of the Development Plan
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Basic

Fundraisers do it, you should too! Do you have specific goals and strategies in place to secure financial support? While it’s important to respond to Request for Proposal's (RFP’s) and RO1’s (NIH Award Type) , being proactive and creating a development plan will result in less headaches and late nights working on grant applications.

Learning objectives:

Provide key steps to creating a development plan that will allow you to manage the process instead of the process managing you.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kathy Harris, Director, Office of Sponsored Projects, March of Dimes Foundation

W201: The National Science Foundation (NSF) Proposal Process: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Basic

This session will provide everything you need to know about preparing and submitting a proposal to the National Science Foundation (NSF). Learn about the different types of funding opportunities that NSF employs, where to find the relevant policies governing proposal preparation, merit review, and special guidelines for other topical areas such as conference, RAPID, EAGER and RAISE proposals.

Certificate: IRAM-E

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will understand what to look for in an NSF funding opportunity.
  2. Participants will learn about all the required components of an NSF proposal.
  3. Participants will understand what they may and may not include as part of an NSF proposal.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Samantha Hunter, Senior Policy Specialist, National Science Foundation