Workshops

Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 9:00am to 12:30pm

WS3: Proposal Development

"It is well established that research administrators support the budgetary and compliance needs of investigators. What is less well understood are the large and growing number of additional pre-award responsibilities many of us handle at our institutions. Far from being ‘review and submit’ automaton, research administrators hold many roles. They assist new investigators in learning how to find and successfully apply for grant funding; they work with experienced investigators in updating their grant skills and knowledge; and they are seen by many faculty as their trusted partners in grant submission, the last word on all elements related to pre-award issues.

The pre-award support provided by research administrators to faculty being varied and complex, it requires deep knowledge across multiple skillsets. This support includes teaching faculty to and/or assisting faculty with:
• navigating different types of funders and proposals;
• reading and interpreting proposal guidelines efficiently and accurately;
• planning the proposal, involving timelines and checklists, partners, and cost share;
• understanding what proposal parts or sections are expected, how to best address them, and the need to relate the various sections to each other.

Working with real life case studies and hands-on activities, we’ll take you through the entire process of offering detailed and effective non-budgetary support for a faculty proposal submission. Takeaways will include: creating effective project management materials for a proposal, such as timelines, checklists, and outlines; instruction on clear and concise writing for extra-narrative elements of a proposal; high-level discussion of editing proposals for formatting, grammar, and fit with funding agency guidelines."

Certificate: PA-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Become familiar with types of proposals, learn to manage proposal submission and assist with preparation of various types of applications effectively and efficiently from a faculty-centered perspective.
  2. Interpret and address proposal guidelines, including page limits; edit requested sections for clarity and effectiveness to improve proposals' fundability, using project management tools.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Zoya Davis-Hamilton, EdD, CRA, Director, Research Administration Initiatives; Sarah Marina, Assistant Director, Research Development and Research Administration, Tufts University and Anne Schauer, MA, CRA, Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, Miami University

WS7: Clinical Trial Budgeting Boot Camp

Budgetary issues are at the heart of successful clinical trial conduct. Inadequate budgeting results in hardships at the site level that compromise recruitment and overall trial success. In addition, under budgeting can be seen as a sign of lack of expertise and can undermine credibility in the conduct of research. This session will discuss budget development in a frank and straightforward manner using example clinical trial protocols to demonstrate items, both listed and omitted, that need to be included in calculating a representative cost budget. The participants will interactively discuss issues within the protocol and what impact they will have on the final budget. Generic clinical trial protocols will be examined over the course of the workshop.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Define clinical trial budgetary requirements.
  2. Provide time, cost, and procedural breakdown utilizing protocol as a template.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Pavel Kruchek, MBA, Director, Business Operations, Clinical Trials Office and Vanessa Bryant, Sr. Budget Analyst, Clinical Trials Office, University of Utah

WS2: How Can We Do Better: Ways to Improve Our Team and Services

This workshop will provide various methods that will assist participants improve their customer service. It will provide a method of recognizing a person's behavior style and that style's attributes. Also, methods for problem solving.  These methods assist in team building to enable the team to provide better customer service. A customer is defined as anyone who has needs we fulfill. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Strengthen level of service we provide our customers.
  2. Create a more positive work environment.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kate McCormick,  CRA, Senior Grant Administrator, Suffolk University and Rene Hearns, Center Manager/Study Coordinator/Budget Analyst, IIRECC, US Department of Veterans Affairs

WS4: Localized Research Administration Support for Centers: People, Processes and Technologies

Creating innovative, unique and strategic collaborations within the university across multiple schools/colleges is growing at our university. Collaborative research projects are leading to the start-up cross-disciplinary research centers. Faculty are focused on the science. However, what may not be considered is the administrative infrastructure needed to support the successful operation of a research center. Using a dialectic approach, participants will explore the provision of end-to-end research administration support for interdisciplinary research centers and institutes from the perspective of key stakeholders, faculty, department research administrators and central office administrators. The interactive discussion will capture the pros and cons of dedicated, shared services to support research centers and institutes and the processes and technologies that may be needed to reduce faculty burden.

Content level: Advanced

Learning objectives:

  1. Share and analyze challenges, and offer potential solutions, to working in a dedicated shared services environment with faculty on cross-discipline collaborative research centers.
  2. Discuss processes and technologies to support collaborative research with the potential to reduce faculty burden.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Gwynne Scheffer, MS, Assistant Director, Strategy & Faculty Support, Drexel University

Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 9:00am to 5:00pm

WS1: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Fundamentals

Provides an overview of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), peer review of grant applications,  determination of award levels, grants management review and negotiation of awards, notice of award and pre/post-award management.

Certificate: NIH-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Have a better understanding of the NIH, roles and responsibilities of NIH staff, award mechanisms and grant applications.
  2. Locate funding opportunities, what systems are used at NIH, and pre/post award administration and monitoring.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Theresa Jarosik, Supervisory Grants Management Officer, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and Debbie Pettitt, MBA, Chief Grants Management Officier, National Institutes of Health

WS6: Fundamentals of Research Administration and Management

This is a full-day workshop intended for new research administrators. The workshop provides a broad overview of research administration. Topics include the language of research administration, pre-award administration including regulations, funding opportunities, proposal preparation, compliance, budgeting, proposal submission, sponsor actions; including the review process, site visits and pre-award negotiations; post-award administration including post-award review, project monitoring and close-out and compliance.

Certificate: IRAM-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify pre and post-award activities for sponsored research activity.
  2. Understand the components of and prepare a proposal and manage the post-award process.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Sharon McCarl, MBA, CRA, Associate Dean, Mellon College of Science, Carnegie Mellon University

WS5: It's All about the Money

This workshop examines key issues to budget development, review and monitoring and explores a research administrator's role in service to the sponsor, institution and investigator. Special attention will be paid to assessing project costs, including personnel, consultants, equipment, supplies, travel, subcontracts, total direct costs, income, facilities and administrative costs (F&A) modified total direct costs (MTDC) vs. salary and wage base and cost sharing. In addition sponsor guidelines, institutional polices and the financial precepts of 2 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 200 (Uniform Guidance) will be covered. "Why do we have to do this?" and "Where are the guidelines that say that?" are key questions that will be answered.

Certificate: FM-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify core costs related compliance expectations associated with federal funding.
  2. Support proposal and award management activities consistant with federal regulations.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Timothy Schailey, MS, Director, Research Administration, Thomas Jefferson University; Erin Bailey, Chief Financial Officer, CTSI University at Buffalo and Erin O’Byrne, Research Administrator, University of Buffalo

Sunday, April 2, 2017 - 1:30pm to 5:00pm

WS8: Leadership - Change Management - Overcoming Barriers to Implementation & Optimization

If you're reading this workshop offering, you've no doubt taken your share of courses on teamwork and leadership, communication, conflict resolution. And yet, challenges and barriers remain and performance and change never seem to optimize and change. What sounds great in a seminar presents a daunting challenge to implement in the real world - silence or endless questioning that derails your objective. Why is that? Based on 30 years' experience working with diverse organizations, this workshop introduces you to a psychologist's methodologies: the skills (not theory and not just concepts) to bridge the knowing - implementation gap; operationalizing buy-in and collaboration; the role of language; achieving rapid results; activities-outcomes-results that move you and your group to break the gravitational pull of current thinking to break-through thinking and future state.

Content level: Advanced

Learning objectives:

  1. Demonstrate the foundational skills of buy-in and collaboration: art and science of listening and questioning, languaging, identifying and overcoming layers of resistance.
  2. Demonstrate your operational plan to achieve Expected Results - the sufficiency test.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Stanley Sack, PhD, Organizational, Training & Strategy Consultant, Persona, Inc. and Dwayne Lehman, D.Sc., Business Manager, Carnegie Mellon University

WS10: Subrecipient Monitoring: What Is It and When Is It Enough?

The presenter will lay the foundation of what has become known as “subrecipient monitoring” from the days of the Circulars to today having more focus and attention placed on expectations for oversight and monitoring.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the requirements, tools and methodologies associated with Subrecipient monitoring.
  2. Understand how to identify management and technical risk on subawards ; understand how to develop an effective monitoring plan.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

John Sites, CRA, Manager, Huron Consulting Group

WS9: Fundamentals of Building a Budget

Developing a clear and reasonable budget is one of the most important pieces of the proposal process. The regulations tell us the budget should be the financial expression of the statement of work. The ability to build a budget that directly ties to the work being performed enhances the chances of being funded by the sponsor, and protects us in the case of an audit. Understanding how to work with PIs to craft a sound, reasonable budget and budget justification is essential to our roles as research administrators.

Certificate: PA-R

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Apply the principles of the Uniform Guidance (including allowability, allocability, and reasonableness, and a host of other specific issues) to the budget construction and justification process.
  2. Confidently collaborate with their faculty to build a sound budget which reflects the scope of work.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Rebecca Hunsaker, Director of Research Administration; Gaye Bugenhagen, Director of Administrative Services, Department of Sociology; Marchon Jackson, Director of Sponsored Projects Accounting and Compliance, Division of Research, University of Maryland, College Park